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Prescription Data Mining and the Protection of Patients' Interests

Prescription Data Mining and the Protection of Patients' Interests harmaceutical companies have long relied on Prescription Data direct marketing of their drugs to physicians P through one-on-one meetings with sales rep- resentatives. This practice of “detailing” is substantial Mining and the in its costs and its number of participants. Every year, pharmaceutical companies spend billions of dollars on millions of visits to physicians by tens of thousands Protection of of sales representatives. Critics have argued that drug detailing results in Patients’ Interests sub-optimal prescribing decisions by physicians, com- promising patient health and driving up spending on medical care. In this view, physicians often are unduly David Orentlicher influenced both by marketing presentations that do not accurately reflect evidence from the medical liter - ature and by the gifts that sales representatives deliver in conjunction with their presentations. Accordingly, public officials, professional societies and physicians have called for stricter regulation of the physician-sales representative relationship. Pro- fessional guidelines often include limits on gifts, and medical schools may restrict contacts between sales representatives and physicians. This article considers the legislative efforts by states to address a long-standing, but increasingly refined practice that pharmaceutical companies use to enhance their drug-detailing efforts. Health care information organizations employ computer technology to collect and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Law Medicine & Ethics SAGE

Prescription Data Mining and the Protection of Patients' Interests

The Journal of Law Medicine & Ethics , Volume 38 (1): 11 – Mar 1, 2010

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References (113)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2010 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics
ISSN
1073-1105
eISSN
1748-720X
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-720X.2010.00468.x
pmid
20446986
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

harmaceutical companies have long relied on Prescription Data direct marketing of their drugs to physicians P through one-on-one meetings with sales rep- resentatives. This practice of “detailing” is substantial Mining and the in its costs and its number of participants. Every year, pharmaceutical companies spend billions of dollars on millions of visits to physicians by tens of thousands Protection of of sales representatives. Critics have argued that drug detailing results in Patients’ Interests sub-optimal prescribing decisions by physicians, com- promising patient health and driving up spending on medical care. In this view, physicians often are unduly David Orentlicher influenced both by marketing presentations that do not accurately reflect evidence from the medical liter - ature and by the gifts that sales representatives deliver in conjunction with their presentations. Accordingly, public officials, professional societies and physicians have called for stricter regulation of the physician-sales representative relationship. Pro- fessional guidelines often include limits on gifts, and medical schools may restrict contacts between sales representatives and physicians. This article considers the legislative efforts by states to address a long-standing, but increasingly refined practice that pharmaceutical companies use to enhance their drug-detailing efforts. Health care information organizations employ computer technology to collect and

Journal

The Journal of Law Medicine & EthicsSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2010

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