Perceptions of School-Based Kitchen Garden Programs in Low-Income, African American Communities

Perceptions of School-Based Kitchen Garden Programs in Low-Income, African American Communities Introduction. While school-based kitchen garden programs are shown to improve fruit and vegetable consumption and knowledge among children, there has been little research on participant perceptions of these programs, specifically among minority populations that are disproportionately affected by and at high risk for overweight and obesity. This qualitative study examined the perceptions of and values associated with participation in school-based kitchen garden programs implemented through Edible Schoolyard New Orleans in low-income, predominantly African American schools in New Orleans, Louisiana. Method. Qualitative data were collected through semistructured focus group discussions with key stakeholder groups at schools offering Edible Schoolyard New Orleans. Results. A total of 10 focus groups were conducted across 4 middle schools with students (n = 27), parents (n = 17), and teachers (n = 17). Four primary themes emerged during data analysis: development of life skills, food and health, family and community, and experiential and participatory learning. Conclusions. To strengthen the sustainability and potential impact of school-based kitchen garden programs, future intervention strategies should place specific emphasis on the themes that emerged from this study. School-based kitchen garden programs may be a promising strategy to positively influence the individual, social, and physical environmental factors that contribute to overweight and obesity in low-income, African American communities. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health Promotion Practice SAGE

Perceptions of School-Based Kitchen Garden Programs in Low-Income, African American Communities

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/perceptions-of-school-based-kitchen-garden-programs-in-low-income-e4YUHtlILX
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2018 Society for Public Health Education
ISSN
1524-8399
eISSN
1552-6372
D.O.I.
10.1177/1524839918782157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction. While school-based kitchen garden programs are shown to improve fruit and vegetable consumption and knowledge among children, there has been little research on participant perceptions of these programs, specifically among minority populations that are disproportionately affected by and at high risk for overweight and obesity. This qualitative study examined the perceptions of and values associated with participation in school-based kitchen garden programs implemented through Edible Schoolyard New Orleans in low-income, predominantly African American schools in New Orleans, Louisiana. Method. Qualitative data were collected through semistructured focus group discussions with key stakeholder groups at schools offering Edible Schoolyard New Orleans. Results. A total of 10 focus groups were conducted across 4 middle schools with students (n = 27), parents (n = 17), and teachers (n = 17). Four primary themes emerged during data analysis: development of life skills, food and health, family and community, and experiential and participatory learning. Conclusions. To strengthen the sustainability and potential impact of school-based kitchen garden programs, future intervention strategies should place specific emphasis on the themes that emerged from this study. School-based kitchen garden programs may be a promising strategy to positively influence the individual, social, and physical environmental factors that contribute to overweight and obesity in low-income, African American communities.

Journal

Health Promotion PracticeSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off