Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Orbital and nasal meningoencephaloceles secondary to chronic hydrocephalus: A rare cause of bilateral proptosis

Orbital and nasal meningoencephaloceles secondary to chronic hydrocephalus: A rare cause of... IntroductionOrbital meningoencephalocele formation is primarily a result of congenital defects in the pediatric population and trauma of the anterior cranial fossa in adults. We present a unique case of nontraumatic nasal and orbital meningoencephaloceles presenting as bilateral proptosis with exotropia secondary to chronic hydrocephalus.Clinical presentationA 20-year-old male with a history of tuberous sclerosis, X-linked intellectual disability, and epilepsy presented to the emergency department with two days of nausea, emesis, seizures, and two months of progressive proptosis. Initial radiographs of the skull showed a “copper beaten” appearance, indicating chronically elevated intracranial pressure. Computed tomography imaging of the head demonstrated bilateral defects in the cribriform plate and anterior cranial fossa. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed triventricular hydrocephalus with meningoencephalocele extension into the nasal cavity and frontal horn herniation into the extraconal space of the orbits. The hydrocephalus was managed with ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement with rapid and complete resolution of the proptosis.ConclusionNo reports have described bilateral proptosis as the presenting finding of orbital and nasal meningoencephaloceles in the absence of trauma or congenital defect. This case study demonstrates the management of meningoencephalocele formation secondary to chronic hydrocephalus. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Neuroradiology Journal SAGE

Orbital and nasal meningoencephaloceles secondary to chronic hydrocephalus: A rare cause of bilateral proptosis

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/orbital-and-nasal-meningoencephaloceles-secondary-to-chronic-J5UuUHmeJ8
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
1971-4009
eISSN
2385-1996
DOI
10.1177/1971400918778145
pmid
29882488
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionOrbital meningoencephalocele formation is primarily a result of congenital defects in the pediatric population and trauma of the anterior cranial fossa in adults. We present a unique case of nontraumatic nasal and orbital meningoencephaloceles presenting as bilateral proptosis with exotropia secondary to chronic hydrocephalus.Clinical presentationA 20-year-old male with a history of tuberous sclerosis, X-linked intellectual disability, and epilepsy presented to the emergency department with two days of nausea, emesis, seizures, and two months of progressive proptosis. Initial radiographs of the skull showed a “copper beaten” appearance, indicating chronically elevated intracranial pressure. Computed tomography imaging of the head demonstrated bilateral defects in the cribriform plate and anterior cranial fossa. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed triventricular hydrocephalus with meningoencephalocele extension into the nasal cavity and frontal horn herniation into the extraconal space of the orbits. The hydrocephalus was managed with ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement with rapid and complete resolution of the proptosis.ConclusionNo reports have described bilateral proptosis as the presenting finding of orbital and nasal meningoencephaloceles in the absence of trauma or congenital defect. This case study demonstrates the management of meningoencephalocele formation secondary to chronic hydrocephalus.

Journal

The Neuroradiology JournalSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.