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Open-book, open-web online examinations: Developing examination practices to support university students’ learning and self-efficacy

Open-book, open-web online examinations: Developing examination practices to support university... The aim of this study was to investigate university students’ experiences of open-book, open-web online examinations compared to traditional class examinations concerning preparing, responding, and learning. The data (N = 110) were collected by an online survey from the university students who took an online examination. The students used approximately the same time to study for an online examination as for faculty examination, but over half of them reported using more time for responding and learning more from an online examination compared to a faculty examination. The study supports the earlier findings that assessment methods are essential for students’ learning experiences and that self-efficacy beliefs are essential in positive learning experiences. It also indicates that self-efficacy is affected differently for different students by the online context and that the individual differences in experiencing the learning environment should be taken into account in assessment procedures. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Active Learning in Higher Education SAGE

Open-book, open-web online examinations: Developing examination practices to support university students’ learning and self-efficacy

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References (49)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2015
ISSN
1469-7874
eISSN
1741-2625
DOI
10.1177/1469787415574053
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate university students’ experiences of open-book, open-web online examinations compared to traditional class examinations concerning preparing, responding, and learning. The data (N = 110) were collected by an online survey from the university students who took an online examination. The students used approximately the same time to study for an online examination as for faculty examination, but over half of them reported using more time for responding and learning more from an online examination compared to a faculty examination. The study supports the earlier findings that assessment methods are essential for students’ learning experiences and that self-efficacy beliefs are essential in positive learning experiences. It also indicates that self-efficacy is affected differently for different students by the online context and that the individual differences in experiencing the learning environment should be taken into account in assessment procedures.

Journal

Active Learning in Higher EducationSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2015

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