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On Two Metaphors for Learning and the Dangers of Choosing Just One

On Two Metaphors for Learning and the Dangers of Choosing Just One This article is a sequel to the conversation on learning initiated by the editors of Educational Researcher in volume 25, number 4. The author’s first aim is to elicit the metaphors for learning that guide our work as learners, teachers, and researchers. Two such metaphors are identified: the acquisition metaphor and the participation metaphor. Subsequently, their entailments are discussed and evaluated. Although some of the implications are deemed desirable and others are regarded as harmful, the article neither speaks against a particular metaphor nor tries to make a case for the other. Rather, these interpretations and applications of the metaphors undergo critical evaluation. In the end, the question of theoretical unification of the research on learning is addressed, wherein the purpose is to show how too great a devotion to one particular metaphor can lead to theoretical distortions and to undesirable practices. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Researcher SAGE

On Two Metaphors for Learning and the Dangers of Choosing Just One

Educational Researcher , Volume 27 (2): 10 – Mar 1, 1998

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References (50)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0013-189X
eISSN
1935-102X
DOI
10.3102/0013189X027002004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is a sequel to the conversation on learning initiated by the editors of Educational Researcher in volume 25, number 4. The author’s first aim is to elicit the metaphors for learning that guide our work as learners, teachers, and researchers. Two such metaphors are identified: the acquisition metaphor and the participation metaphor. Subsequently, their entailments are discussed and evaluated. Although some of the implications are deemed desirable and others are regarded as harmful, the article neither speaks against a particular metaphor nor tries to make a case for the other. Rather, these interpretations and applications of the metaphors undergo critical evaluation. In the end, the question of theoretical unification of the research on learning is addressed, wherein the purpose is to show how too great a devotion to one particular metaphor can lead to theoretical distortions and to undesirable practices.

Journal

Educational ResearcherSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 1998

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