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On Frontline Workers as Bureau-Political Actors: The Case of Civil–Military Crisis Management

On Frontline Workers as Bureau-Political Actors: The Case of Civil–Military Crisis Management We focus attention on the public policy-making influence of frontline bureaucrats. They are increasingly operating in interorganizational partnerships and networks in which they develop collaborative relations with frontline workers of other public organizations. We theorize that their embeddedness in local interorganizational environments induces and enables them to defy locally inappropriate policies and to pursue locally relevant policies as policy entrepreneurs simultaneously. The case study of policy-making in Dutch civil–military crisis management demonstrates that this “frontline bureaucratic politics” bears considerably on policy outcomes. We conclude that viewing frontline workers as bureau-political actors enhances our understanding of public policy-making in interorganizational arrangements. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Administration & Society SAGE

On Frontline Workers as Bureau-Political Actors: The Case of Civil–Military Crisis Management

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
0095-3997
eISSN
1552-3039
DOI
10.1177/0095399718780581
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We focus attention on the public policy-making influence of frontline bureaucrats. They are increasingly operating in interorganizational partnerships and networks in which they develop collaborative relations with frontline workers of other public organizations. We theorize that their embeddedness in local interorganizational environments induces and enables them to defy locally inappropriate policies and to pursue locally relevant policies as policy entrepreneurs simultaneously. The case study of policy-making in Dutch civil–military crisis management demonstrates that this “frontline bureaucratic politics” bears considerably on policy outcomes. We conclude that viewing frontline workers as bureau-political actors enhances our understanding of public policy-making in interorganizational arrangements.

Journal

Administration & SocietySAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2019

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