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Making textiles into persons: Gestural sequences and relationality in communities of weaving practice of the South Central Andes

Making textiles into persons: Gestural sequences and relationality in communities of weaving... The complex social and technical dimensions of weaving in contemporary Andean communities of practice are examined to suggest how these might have evolved so that populations could coordinate and make sense of their daily tasks in an emerging biocultural space. Rejecting former constructivist epistemological biases in operational studies of working practice, the article explores an alternative approach where technical practice is given meaning through ways of being in the world, and where common sense-making derives from the idea that textiles are living beings. The nurturing processes of a relational ontology where ‘making’ is ‘growing’ are traced in the patterns of learning and their gestural sequencing in weaving communities, in winding instruments that intercalate productive spheres and in finished textiles that express productive yields. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Material Culture SAGE

Making textiles into persons: Gestural sequences and relationality in communities of weaving practice of the South Central Andes

Journal of Material Culture , Volume 23 (2): 22 – Jun 1, 2018

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
1359-1835
eISSN
1460-3586
DOI
10.1177/1359183517750007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The complex social and technical dimensions of weaving in contemporary Andean communities of practice are examined to suggest how these might have evolved so that populations could coordinate and make sense of their daily tasks in an emerging biocultural space. Rejecting former constructivist epistemological biases in operational studies of working practice, the article explores an alternative approach where technical practice is given meaning through ways of being in the world, and where common sense-making derives from the idea that textiles are living beings. The nurturing processes of a relational ontology where ‘making’ is ‘growing’ are traced in the patterns of learning and their gestural sequencing in weaving communities, in winding instruments that intercalate productive spheres and in finished textiles that express productive yields.

Journal

Journal of Material CultureSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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