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Licensing in the Barbering Profession

Licensing in the Barbering Profession LICENSING IN THE BARBERING PROFESSION ROBERT J. THORNTON and R. ANDREW WEINTRAUB STIMATES The economist's interest in occupational that there are suggest currently licensing has a history that traces as far back at least seven million individuals em- ployed in occupations requiring licenses as Adam Smith's discourse on "The In- to practice.1 Licensing requirements affect equalities of Wages and Profit."3 Smith's discussion of the unnecessarily long ap- not only those in traditionally licensed occupations, such as barbers, plumbers, and prenticeships imposed on new entrants to electricians, but also such unlikely workers various trades-and the corresponding effects on the of -is as jockeys, tattoo artists, egg graders, and wages labor as relevant tree surgeons. In all, more than 2,800 sepa- today as when it was first written. The wage rate state licensing provisions are in effect benefits that may accrue to existing mem- varia- bers of any licensed profession or across the country. Yet considerable occupa- tion exists in the number of occupations tion, along with the resultant misallocation licensed in the various states.2 Illinois, for of resources, are usually singled out as the example, requires a license to practice in no major economic impacts of effective occu- fewer than http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ILR Review SAGE

Licensing in the Barbering Profession

ILR Review , Volume 32 (2): 8 – Jan 1, 1979

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1979 Cornell University
ISSN
0019-7939
eISSN
2162-271X
DOI
10.1177/001979397903200207
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

LICENSING IN THE BARBERING PROFESSION ROBERT J. THORNTON and R. ANDREW WEINTRAUB STIMATES The economist's interest in occupational that there are suggest currently licensing has a history that traces as far back at least seven million individuals em- ployed in occupations requiring licenses as Adam Smith's discourse on "The In- to practice.1 Licensing requirements affect equalities of Wages and Profit."3 Smith's discussion of the unnecessarily long ap- not only those in traditionally licensed occupations, such as barbers, plumbers, and prenticeships imposed on new entrants to electricians, but also such unlikely workers various trades-and the corresponding effects on the of -is as jockeys, tattoo artists, egg graders, and wages labor as relevant tree surgeons. In all, more than 2,800 sepa- today as when it was first written. The wage rate state licensing provisions are in effect benefits that may accrue to existing mem- varia- bers of any licensed profession or across the country. Yet considerable occupa- tion exists in the number of occupations tion, along with the resultant misallocation licensed in the various states.2 Illinois, for of resources, are usually singled out as the example, requires a license to practice in no major economic impacts of effective occu- fewer than

Journal

ILR ReviewSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 1979

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