Letter to the Editor

Letter to the Editor Journal of Research in Nursing 2018, Vol. 23(4) 380–381 ! The Author(s) 2018 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/1744987118778986 journals.sagepub.com/home/jrn Lynette Cusack lynette.cusack@adelaide.edu.au Desley Hegney d.hegney@cqu.edu.au Clare Rees C.Rees@curtin.edu.au Dear Editor We are writing in response to the Guest Editorial: What’s wrong with resilience by Michael Traynor, published February 12, 2018. We noted with interest My Traynor’s comments on resilience in nursing. As a multidisciplinary research collaborative (including nursing) we have been engaged for a number of years in understanding both the psychological and environmental factors of resilience for health professionals. To a certain extent we agree that previous research in this area has mainly looked at factors related to individual resilience. However it is important to understand occupational resilience from an individual perspective. Our published resilience model titled Health Services Workplace Environmental Resilience Model (HSWERM) (Cusack, Smith, Hegney, Breen, Witt et al 2016) has taken into consideration both the individual psychological components of resilience as well as the environmental factors that support and sustain a health practitioner’s ability to be resilient. We agree that understanding what environmental factors in the workplace are essential to promote the psychological resilience of nurses is important to the health care system, because http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Research in Nursing SAGE

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
1744-9871
eISSN
1744-988X
D.O.I.
10.1177/1744987118778986
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of Research in Nursing 2018, Vol. 23(4) 380–381 ! The Author(s) 2018 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/1744987118778986 journals.sagepub.com/home/jrn Lynette Cusack lynette.cusack@adelaide.edu.au Desley Hegney d.hegney@cqu.edu.au Clare Rees C.Rees@curtin.edu.au Dear Editor We are writing in response to the Guest Editorial: What’s wrong with resilience by Michael Traynor, published February 12, 2018. We noted with interest My Traynor’s comments on resilience in nursing. As a multidisciplinary research collaborative (including nursing) we have been engaged for a number of years in understanding both the psychological and environmental factors of resilience for health professionals. To a certain extent we agree that previous research in this area has mainly looked at factors related to individual resilience. However it is important to understand occupational resilience from an individual perspective. Our published resilience model titled Health Services Workplace Environmental Resilience Model (HSWERM) (Cusack, Smith, Hegney, Breen, Witt et al 2016) has taken into consideration both the individual psychological components of resilience as well as the environmental factors that support and sustain a health practitioner’s ability to be resilient. We agree that understanding what environmental factors in the workplace are essential to promote the psychological resilience of nurses is important to the health care system, because

Journal

Journal of Research in NursingSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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