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Learning by Design: Good Video Games as Learning Machines

Learning by Design: Good Video Games as Learning Machines This article asks how good video and computer game designers manage to get new players to learn long, complex and difficult games. The short answer is that designers of good games have hit on excellent methods for getting people to learn and to enjoy learning. The longer answer is more complex. Integral to this answer are the good principles of learning built into successful games. The author discusses 13 such principles under the headings of ‘Empowered Learners’, ‘Problem Solving’ and ‘Understanding’ and concludes that the main impediment to implementing these principles in formal education is cost. This, however, is not only (or even so much) monetary cost. It is, importantly, the cost of changing minds about how and where learning is done and of changing one of our most profoundly change-resistant institutions: the school. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png E-Learning and Digital Media SAGE

Learning by Design: Good Video Games as Learning Machines

E-Learning and Digital Media , Volume 2 (1): 12 – Mar 1, 2005

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References (22)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2005 SAGE Publications
ISSN
2042-7530
eISSN
2042-7530
DOI
10.2304/elea.2005.2.1.5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article asks how good video and computer game designers manage to get new players to learn long, complex and difficult games. The short answer is that designers of good games have hit on excellent methods for getting people to learn and to enjoy learning. The longer answer is more complex. Integral to this answer are the good principles of learning built into successful games. The author discusses 13 such principles under the headings of ‘Empowered Learners’, ‘Problem Solving’ and ‘Understanding’ and concludes that the main impediment to implementing these principles in formal education is cost. This, however, is not only (or even so much) monetary cost. It is, importantly, the cost of changing minds about how and where learning is done and of changing one of our most profoundly change-resistant institutions: the school.

Journal

E-Learning and Digital MediaSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2005

There are no references for this article.