Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Subscribe now for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Justification Effects on Consumer Choice of Hedonic and Utilitarian Goods

Justification Effects on Consumer Choice of Hedonic and Utilitarian Goods People want to have fun, and they are more likely to have fun if the situation allows them to justify it. This research studies how people's need for justifying hedonic consumption drives two choice patterns that are observed in typical purchase contexts. First, relative preferences between hedonic and utilitarian alternatives can reverse, depending on how the immediate purchase situation presents itself. A hedonic alternative tends to be rated more highly than a comparable utilitarian alternative when each is presented singly, but the utilitarian alternative tends to be chosen over the hedonic alternative when the two are presented jointly. Second, people have preferences for expending different combinations of time (effort) and money for acquiring hedonic versus utilitarian items. They are willing to pay more in time for hedonic goods and more in money for utilitarian goods. The author explores the topic through a combination of four experiments and field studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Marketing Research SAGE

Justification Effects on Consumer Choice of Hedonic and Utilitarian Goods

Journal of Marketing Research , Volume 42 (1): 11 – Feb 1, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/justification-effects-on-consumer-choice-of-hedonic-and-utilitarian-Jb5eS8dOUK

References (46)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2005 American Marketing Association
ISSN
0022-2437
eISSN
1547-7193
DOI
10.1509/jmkr.42.1.43.56889
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

People want to have fun, and they are more likely to have fun if the situation allows them to justify it. This research studies how people's need for justifying hedonic consumption drives two choice patterns that are observed in typical purchase contexts. First, relative preferences between hedonic and utilitarian alternatives can reverse, depending on how the immediate purchase situation presents itself. A hedonic alternative tends to be rated more highly than a comparable utilitarian alternative when each is presented singly, but the utilitarian alternative tends to be chosen over the hedonic alternative when the two are presented jointly. Second, people have preferences for expending different combinations of time (effort) and money for acquiring hedonic versus utilitarian items. They are willing to pay more in time for hedonic goods and more in money for utilitarian goods. The author explores the topic through a combination of four experiments and field studies.

Journal

Journal of Marketing ResearchSAGE

Published: Feb 1, 2005

There are no references for this article.