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Job insecurity, employability and satisfaction among temporary and permanent employees in post-crisis Europe

Job insecurity, employability and satisfaction among temporary and permanent employees in... Earlier studies established that perceived job insecurity is more strongly related to the experiences of permanent employees, and conversely that perceived employability is more strongly related to the experiences of temporary employees. This article challenges these results against the background of the 2008/2009 crisis using samples from the 2010 European Social Survey with employees from Continental and Mediterranean Europe. First, the authors argue that job insecurity has become a structural phenomenon that associates with temporary and permanent employees’ satisfaction in the same fashion, which found overall support. Second, they argue that employability may have become important for all employees, regardless of contract type, which was largely supported. A cause for concern is that the relationship between perceived job insecurity and satisfaction was comparatively stronger than the relationship between perceived employability and satisfaction. This may suggest that employees have not yet fully embraced ideas about employability as the new form of security. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Economic and Industrial Democracy: An International Journal SAGE

Job insecurity, employability and satisfaction among temporary and permanent employees in post-crisis Europe

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References (76)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
0143-831X
eISSN
1461-7099
DOI
10.1177/0143831X18804655
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Earlier studies established that perceived job insecurity is more strongly related to the experiences of permanent employees, and conversely that perceived employability is more strongly related to the experiences of temporary employees. This article challenges these results against the background of the 2008/2009 crisis using samples from the 2010 European Social Survey with employees from Continental and Mediterranean Europe. First, the authors argue that job insecurity has become a structural phenomenon that associates with temporary and permanent employees’ satisfaction in the same fashion, which found overall support. Second, they argue that employability may have become important for all employees, regardless of contract type, which was largely supported. A cause for concern is that the relationship between perceived job insecurity and satisfaction was comparatively stronger than the relationship between perceived employability and satisfaction. This may suggest that employees have not yet fully embraced ideas about employability as the new form of security.

Journal

Economic and Industrial Democracy: An International JournalSAGE

Published: May 1, 2019

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