“It's as if you're some alien…’ Exploring Anti-English Attitudes in Scotland. ‘

“It's as if you're some alien…’ Exploring Anti-English Attitudes in Scotland. ‘ English people are the largest national or ethnic minority within Scotland but remain under-researched. This is despite a view taken by many writers, and by the popular press, that anti-English attitudes within Scotland are a major social problem. Via 30 in-depth interviews, this paper explores the experiences of a group of English people living in Scotland and the extent and nature of any anti-Englishness they have encountered. The paper also focuses on the ways in which notions of race, ethnicity and essential differences between Scots and English people are regularly encountered by English people living in Scotland. The ‘racialisation’ of the English minority in Scotland is also discussed in this context. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociological Research Online SAGE

“It's as if you're some alien…’ Exploring Anti-English Attitudes in Scotland. ‘

“It's as if you're some alien…’ Exploring Anti-English Attitudes in Scotland. ‘

English people are the largest national or ethnic minority within Scotland but remain under-researched. This is despite a view taken by many writers, and by the popular press, that anti-English attitudes within Scotland are a major social problem. Via 30 in-depth interviews, this paper explores the experiences of a group of English people living in Scotland and the extent and nature of any anti-Englishness they have encountered. The paper also focuses on the ways in which notions of race, ethnicity and essential differences between Scots and English people are regularly encountered by English people living in Scotland. The 'racialisation' of the English minority in Scotland is also discussed in this context. Keywords: Anti- Englishness; Belonging; Englishness; Essentialism.; Ethnicity; Racialisation; Scottishness Introduction 1.1 There has been considerable debate, inquiry and concern in Scotland as to whether there has been a rise, or indeed a consolidation, of anti-English attitudes and activities. Some degree of anti-Englishness has been a constant part of the background of Scottish social, cultural and political life for generations (Scott, 1998). However in recent years the intensity and frequency of 'moral panics' (Cohen, 1972; Thompson, 1998) about anti-Englishness and the associated level of media coverage has reached unprecedented levels. This has occurred to such an extent that anti-Englishness is seen to be a key social problem within contemporary Scottish society (Brown et al., 1996). The interest in such issues has been heightened with the establishment in 1999 of the first Scottish Parliament since 1707. The impact of devolution on the attachment people have to a Scottish national identity and the consequences for any anti- Englishness is an important issue within Scotland. It is against such a backdrop that this paper explores the nature and experience of anti-Englishness and proffers some explanations for its existence and...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/it-s-as-if-you-re-some-alien-exploring-anti-english-attitudes-in-0R00jmRvjU
Publisher
SAGE Publications
Copyright
© 2004 SAGE Publications and the British Sociological Association
ISSN
1360-7804
eISSN
1360-7804
D.O.I.
10.5153/sro.922
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

English people are the largest national or ethnic minority within Scotland but remain under-researched. This is despite a view taken by many writers, and by the popular press, that anti-English attitudes within Scotland are a major social problem. Via 30 in-depth interviews, this paper explores the experiences of a group of English people living in Scotland and the extent and nature of any anti-Englishness they have encountered. The paper also focuses on the ways in which notions of race, ethnicity and essential differences between Scots and English people are regularly encountered by English people living in Scotland. The ‘racialisation’ of the English minority in Scotland is also discussed in this context.

Journal

Sociological Research OnlineSAGE

Published: May 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off