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Intergroup Contact: The Past, Present, and the Future

Intergroup Contact: The Past, Present, and the Future The Contact Hypothesis has long been considered one of psychology’s most effective strategies for improving intergroup relations. In this article, we review the history of the development of the Contact Hypothesis, and then we examine recent developments in this area. Specifically, we consider the conditions that are required for successful contact to occur (e.g. cooperation), investigate basic psychological processes that may mediate the consequent reductions in bias (e.g. decreased intergroup anxiety, increased common group representations), and explore factors that can facilitate the generalization of the benefits of intergroup contact in terms of more positive attitudes toward the outgroup as a whole (e.g. increased group salience). We conclude by outlining the contents of the contributions to this Special Issue on Intergroup Contact, highlighting common themes, and identifying findings that suggest directions for future research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Group Processes & Intergroup Relations SAGE

Intergroup Contact: The Past, Present, and the Future

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References (98)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1368-4302
eISSN
1461-7188
DOI
10.1177/1368430203006001009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Contact Hypothesis has long been considered one of psychology’s most effective strategies for improving intergroup relations. In this article, we review the history of the development of the Contact Hypothesis, and then we examine recent developments in this area. Specifically, we consider the conditions that are required for successful contact to occur (e.g. cooperation), investigate basic psychological processes that may mediate the consequent reductions in bias (e.g. decreased intergroup anxiety, increased common group representations), and explore factors that can facilitate the generalization of the benefits of intergroup contact in terms of more positive attitudes toward the outgroup as a whole (e.g. increased group salience). We conclude by outlining the contents of the contributions to this Special Issue on Intergroup Contact, highlighting common themes, and identifying findings that suggest directions for future research.

Journal

Group Processes & Intergroup RelationsSAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2003

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