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Institutionalizing Dualism: Complementarities and Change in France and Germany

Institutionalizing Dualism: Complementarities and Change in France and Germany The French and German political economies have been significantly reconfigured over the past two decades. Although the changes have often been more piecemeal than revolutionary, their cumulative effects are profound. The authors characterize the changes that have taken place as involving the institutionalization of new forms of dualism and argue that what gives contemporary developments a different character from the past is that dualism is now explicitly underwritten by state policy. They see this outcome as the culmination of a sequence of developments, beginning in the field of industrial relations, moving into labor market dynamics, and finally finding institutional expression in welfare state reforms. Contrary to theoretical accounts that suggest that institutional complementarities support stability and institutional reproduction, the authors argue that the linkages across these realms have helped to translate employer strategies that originated in the realm of industrial relations into a stable, new, and less egalitarian model with state support. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Politics & Society SAGE

Institutionalizing Dualism: Complementarities and Change in France and Germany

Politics & Society , Volume 38 (1): 30 – Mar 1, 2010

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References (85)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2010 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0032-3292
eISSN
1552-7514
DOI
10.1177/0032329209357888
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The French and German political economies have been significantly reconfigured over the past two decades. Although the changes have often been more piecemeal than revolutionary, their cumulative effects are profound. The authors characterize the changes that have taken place as involving the institutionalization of new forms of dualism and argue that what gives contemporary developments a different character from the past is that dualism is now explicitly underwritten by state policy. They see this outcome as the culmination of a sequence of developments, beginning in the field of industrial relations, moving into labor market dynamics, and finally finding institutional expression in welfare state reforms. Contrary to theoretical accounts that suggest that institutional complementarities support stability and institutional reproduction, the authors argue that the linkages across these realms have helped to translate employer strategies that originated in the realm of industrial relations into a stable, new, and less egalitarian model with state support.

Journal

Politics & SocietySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2010

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