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Innovation in Nuclear Technology: Key to its Future Success

Innovation in Nuclear Technology: Key to its Future Success INNOVATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNOLOG Y: KEY TO IT S FUTURE SUCCESS Rogner, Hans-Holger; K upitz, J ürg en; L anglois, Lucille; M cDonald, Alan International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA ), V6, A6 [email protected] 1. CURRENT STATUS – NUCLEAR POWER At the end of 2 000, there were 438 nuclear power plants in o peration a round th e world. They r epresented a total c apacity of 35 1 Gigawatts of el ectricity (GWe ) and, in 2 000, produced 16% of th e world’s electricity. This gl obal snap shot, however, masks both a considerable slow-down in i ncremental global nuclear power generation, and some underlying an d quite divergent r egional t rends (see Figures I an d II ). In N orth America, no new reactors are under construction or o n order. Perhaps with the exception of F inland an d possibly France, the same is true i n W estern Europe, where there is currently si gnificant excess capacity in th e electricity sector. Where new generation capacity is required, in vestors generally prefer a lternatives that are less expensive than the large, capital-intensive units now offered b y the nuclear industry. In a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Energy & Environment SAGE

Innovation in Nuclear Technology: Key to its Future Success

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References (10)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2002 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0958-305X
eISSN
2048-4070
DOI
10.1260/095830502320939589
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INNOVATION IN NUCLEAR TECHNOLOG Y: KEY TO IT S FUTURE SUCCESS Rogner, Hans-Holger; K upitz, J ürg en; L anglois, Lucille; M cDonald, Alan International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA ), V6, A6 [email protected] 1. CURRENT STATUS – NUCLEAR POWER At the end of 2 000, there were 438 nuclear power plants in o peration a round th e world. They r epresented a total c apacity of 35 1 Gigawatts of el ectricity (GWe ) and, in 2 000, produced 16% of th e world’s electricity. This gl obal snap shot, however, masks both a considerable slow-down in i ncremental global nuclear power generation, and some underlying an d quite divergent r egional t rends (see Figures I an d II ). In N orth America, no new reactors are under construction or o n order. Perhaps with the exception of F inland an d possibly France, the same is true i n W estern Europe, where there is currently si gnificant excess capacity in th e electricity sector. Where new generation capacity is required, in vestors generally prefer a lternatives that are less expensive than the large, capital-intensive units now offered b y the nuclear industry. In a

Journal

Energy & EnvironmentSAGE

Published: Sep 1, 2002

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