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Inequality in the Promised Land

Inequality in the Promised Land Book Reviews 585 in need of rescue and protection (the adoptee), and, self-narratives. The second part, “Constructing above all, of who is in charge and who can claim and Ethno-racial Identities in Adoption,” consists of perform ownership and agency (the adopter). Until articles looking at how transracial and transna- recently, however, scholarly interest in these two tional adoptive families are sometimes seen as uto- practices has been limited to social work, medicine pian multicultural families transcending race and and psychology, and outcome studies, and it is only being truly and authentically colorblind, as well as during the past decade that scholars in postcolonial how race and whiteness are played out by transra- and critical race studies have started to look at the cial adoptees and how the cultures of the countries colonial and racial aspects of transracial and transna- of origin are constructed and imagined by the tional adoption. It is of course fascinating and inter- adopters. Here, Amy E. Traver writes about how esting to speculate and delve more deeply into why white adoptive parents in the United States interact this is the case, namely, why the issue of transracial with and identify with Chinese Americans and how http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociology of Race and Ethnicity SAGE

Inequality in the Promised Land

Sociology of Race and Ethnicity , Volume 1 (4): 2 – Oct 1, 2015

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© American Sociological Association 2015
ISSN
2332-6492
eISSN
2332-6506
DOI
10.1177/2332649215597204
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews 585 in need of rescue and protection (the adoptee), and, self-narratives. The second part, “Constructing above all, of who is in charge and who can claim and Ethno-racial Identities in Adoption,” consists of perform ownership and agency (the adopter). Until articles looking at how transracial and transna- recently, however, scholarly interest in these two tional adoptive families are sometimes seen as uto- practices has been limited to social work, medicine pian multicultural families transcending race and and psychology, and outcome studies, and it is only being truly and authentically colorblind, as well as during the past decade that scholars in postcolonial how race and whiteness are played out by transra- and critical race studies have started to look at the cial adoptees and how the cultures of the countries colonial and racial aspects of transracial and transna- of origin are constructed and imagined by the tional adoption. It is of course fascinating and inter- adopters. Here, Amy E. Traver writes about how esting to speculate and delve more deeply into why white adoptive parents in the United States interact this is the case, namely, why the issue of transracial with and identify with Chinese Americans and how

Journal

Sociology of Race and EthnicitySAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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