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Doing interview-based qualitative research: A learner’s guide Eva Magnusson and Jeanne Marecek

Doing interview-based qualitative research: A learner’s guide Eva Magnusson and Jeanne Marecek 542 Feminism & Psychology 28(4) In her writing, Ruti at times uses very direct language, voicing her position on the evolutionary ideas put forward by some of the authors. In doing so, she directly speaks to and engages with the reader, for example: ‘‘But let’s not miss Wright’s main point, namely that any active display of female sexual desire results in her being disrespected, even deemed ‘contemptible’, so ladies, once again, you have a clear-cut choice: Sex or respect’’ (p. 41). This conversation continues throughout the book, and Ruti’s arguments become clearer and more engaging as the book goes on. Overall, Ruti’s arguments are, paradoxically, complex and simple at the same time: While she takes a clear stance against the incorrect focus on gender differences rather than similarities in human mate preferences, she includes an incredible amount of literature from a variety of academic disciplines to create a strong and compelling line of argument. In conclusion, I found The Age of Scientific Sexism engaging and easy to read. The narrative of the book benefits from the direct conversation Ruti has with her reader and the clarity of her ideas. Although I would classify this book as more intended for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Feminism & Psychology: An International Journal SAGE

Doing interview-based qualitative research: A learner’s guide Eva Magnusson and Jeanne Marecek

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References (7)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
0959-3535
eISSN
1461-7161
DOI
10.1177/0959353518779616
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

542 Feminism & Psychology 28(4) In her writing, Ruti at times uses very direct language, voicing her position on the evolutionary ideas put forward by some of the authors. In doing so, she directly speaks to and engages with the reader, for example: ‘‘But let’s not miss Wright’s main point, namely that any active display of female sexual desire results in her being disrespected, even deemed ‘contemptible’, so ladies, once again, you have a clear-cut choice: Sex or respect’’ (p. 41). This conversation continues throughout the book, and Ruti’s arguments become clearer and more engaging as the book goes on. Overall, Ruti’s arguments are, paradoxically, complex and simple at the same time: While she takes a clear stance against the incorrect focus on gender differences rather than similarities in human mate preferences, she includes an incredible amount of literature from a variety of academic disciplines to create a strong and compelling line of argument. In conclusion, I found The Age of Scientific Sexism engaging and easy to read. The narrative of the book benefits from the direct conversation Ruti has with her reader and the clarity of her ideas. Although I would classify this book as more intended for

Journal

Feminism & Psychology: An International JournalSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2018

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