“Whoa! It’s like Spotify but for academic articles.”

Instant Access to Thousands of Journals for just $40/month

Epinephrine Self-Administration in Anaphylactic Emergencies: Comparison of Commonly Available Autoinjectors

Life-threatening anaphylactic emergencies are largely unpredictable. Epinephrine is widely accepted as first-line therapy for anaphylaxis, due to its physiological effects in reversing symptoms of anaphylaxis and with studies showing both reductions in morbidity and mortality associated with its administration. Anaphylaxis can prove fatal; therefore, learning how to use an epinephrine autoinjector is crucial for people with allergies and parents of children who have previously suffered from anaphylaxis. Such people must carry an epinephrine autoinjector with them at all times for administration when required. During an anaphylactic emergency, not only is it important that adrenaline is administered into the correct tissue compartment but also that the correct dose of adrenaline is administered to achieve the desired clinical effect. Studies have shown that on average, on device activation, syringe-based autoinjectors (eg, Anapen, Twinject, and Adrenaclick) are only capable of delivering 25.7% of the total 300 µg (77 µg or 0.08 mL of the 0.3 mL) of the dose contained in the device, whereas the EpiPen autoinjector (a cartridge-based device) delivers 74.3% (223 µg or 0.22 mL of the 0.3 mL) of the dose contained in its device. This is due to key fundamental differences between the 2 autoinjectors with the EpiPen employing a cartridge-based mechanism and having adequate needle length for correct intramuscular compartment delivery of epinephrine compared with syringe-based devices. For patients experiencing an anaphylactic emergency, it is vital that a sufficient amount of the life-saving drug is promptly delivered to the correct tissue compartment in minimal time to ensure maximal clinical benefit. Evidence to date has shown that the cartridge-based autoinjector device (ie, EpiPen) rapidly delivers the greatest amount of epinephrine to the correct tissue compartment for use by patients in anaphylactic emergencies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Asthma and Allergy Educators SAGE

Epinephrine Self-Administration in Anaphylactic Emergencies: Comparison of Commonly Available Autoinjectors

Abstract

Life-threatening anaphylactic emergencies are largely unpredictable. Epinephrine is widely accepted as first-line therapy for anaphylaxis, due to its physiological effects in reversing symptoms of anaphylaxis and with studies showing both reductions in morbidity and mortality associated with its administration. Anaphylaxis can prove fatal; therefore, learning how to use an epinephrine autoinjector is crucial for people with allergies and parents of children who have previously suffered from anaphylaxis. Such people must carry an epinephrine autoinjector with them at all times for administration when required. During an anaphylactic emergency, not only is it important that adrenaline is administered into the correct tissue compartment but also that the correct dose of adrenaline is administered to achieve the desired clinical effect. Studies have shown that on average, on device activation, syringe-based autoinjectors (eg, Anapen, Twinject, and Adrenaclick) are only capable of delivering 25.7% of the total 300 µg (77 µg or 0.08 mL of the 0.3 mL) of the dose contained in the device, whereas the EpiPen autoinjector (a cartridge-based device) delivers 74.3% (223 µg or 0.22 mL of the 0.3 mL) of the dose contained in its device. This is due to key fundamental differences between the 2 autoinjectors with the EpiPen employing a cartridge-based mechanism and having adequate needle length for correct intramuscular compartment delivery of epinephrine compared with syringe-based devices. For patients experiencing an anaphylactic emergency, it is vital that a sufficient amount of the life-saving drug is promptly delivered to the correct tissue compartment in minimal time to ensure maximal clinical benefit. Evidence to date has shown that the cartridge-based autoinjector device (ie, EpiPen) rapidly delivers the greatest amount of epinephrine to the correct tissue compartment for use by patients in anaphylactic emergencies.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/epinephrine-self-administration-in-anaphylactic-emergencies-comparison-0SiseB0rLI

Sorry, we don’t have permission to share this article on DeepDyve,
but here are related articles that you can start reading right now:

Explore the DeepDyve Library

How DeepDyve Works

Spend time researching, not time worrying you’re buying articles that might not be useful.

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from Springer, Elsevier, Nature, IEEE, Wiley-Blackwell and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Simple and Affordable Pricing

14-day free trial. Cancel anytime, with a 30-day money-back guarantee.

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$40/month

Best Deal — 25% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 25% off!
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$30/month
billed annually