Entry remnants in flow-diverted aneurysms: Does branch geometry influence aneurysm closure?

Entry remnants in flow-diverted aneurysms: Does branch geometry influence aneurysm closure? ObjectiveNumerous studies have suggested a relationship between delayed occlusion of intracranial aneurysms treated with the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) and the presence of an incorporated branch. However, in some cases, flow diversion may still be the preferred treatment option. This study sought to determine whether geometric factors pertaining to relative size and angulation of branch vessel(s) can be measured in a reliable fashion and whether they are related to occlusion rates.MethodsEighty aneurysms treated at a single neurovascular center from November 2008 to June 2014 were identified. Two blinded raters prospectively reviewed the imaging performed at the time of the procedure and measured the following geometric variables: inflow jet/incorporated branch direction angle and branch artery/ parent artery ratio. Delayed occlusion was defined as the absence of complete aneurysmal occlusion at one year. Analysis was performed using logistic regression and intra-class correlation co-efficient (ICC).ResultsTwenty-four (30%) aneurysms with 28 incorporated branches were identified. A trend toward higher inflow jet/incorporated branch direction angle was found in the group of aneurysms demonstrating delayed occlusion when compared to the group with complete occlusion. ICC revealed high correlation. Overall lower one-year occlusion rates of 53% versus 73% for aneurysms with and without incorporated branches, respectively, were also noted.ConclusionsThe presence of an incorporated branch conferred a 20% absolute risk increase for delayed aneurysmal occlusion. Incorporated branches with a larger angle between the inflow jet and the incorporated branch direction exhibited a trend toward lower occlusion rates. This might be further investigated using a multicenter approach in conjunction with other potentially relevant clinical and angiographic variables. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Interventional Neuroradiology SAGE

Entry remnants in flow-diverted aneurysms: Does branch geometry influence aneurysm closure?

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Publisher
SAGE Publications
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
1591-0199
eISSN
2385-2011
D.O.I.
10.1177/1591019918779229
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ObjectiveNumerous studies have suggested a relationship between delayed occlusion of intracranial aneurysms treated with the Pipeline Embolization Device (PED) and the presence of an incorporated branch. However, in some cases, flow diversion may still be the preferred treatment option. This study sought to determine whether geometric factors pertaining to relative size and angulation of branch vessel(s) can be measured in a reliable fashion and whether they are related to occlusion rates.MethodsEighty aneurysms treated at a single neurovascular center from November 2008 to June 2014 were identified. Two blinded raters prospectively reviewed the imaging performed at the time of the procedure and measured the following geometric variables: inflow jet/incorporated branch direction angle and branch artery/ parent artery ratio. Delayed occlusion was defined as the absence of complete aneurysmal occlusion at one year. Analysis was performed using logistic regression and intra-class correlation co-efficient (ICC).ResultsTwenty-four (30%) aneurysms with 28 incorporated branches were identified. A trend toward higher inflow jet/incorporated branch direction angle was found in the group of aneurysms demonstrating delayed occlusion when compared to the group with complete occlusion. ICC revealed high correlation. Overall lower one-year occlusion rates of 53% versus 73% for aneurysms with and without incorporated branches, respectively, were also noted.ConclusionsThe presence of an incorporated branch conferred a 20% absolute risk increase for delayed aneurysmal occlusion. Incorporated branches with a larger angle between the inflow jet and the incorporated branch direction exhibited a trend toward lower occlusion rates. This might be further investigated using a multicenter approach in conjunction with other potentially relevant clinical and angiographic variables.

Journal

Interventional NeuroradiologySAGE

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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