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Enterprise Education: Influencing Students’ Perceptions of Entrepreneurship

Enterprise Education: Influencing Students’ Perceptions of Entrepreneurship This research examines the effect of participation in an enterprise education program on perceptions of the desirability and feasibility of starting a business. Changes in the perceptions of a sample of secondary school students enrolled in the Young Achievement Australia (YAA) enterprise program are analysed using a pre–test post–test control group research design. After completing the enterprise program, participants reported significantly higher perceptions of both desirability and feasibility. The degree of change in perceptions is related to the positiveness of prior experience and to the positiveness of the experience in the enterprise education program. Self–efficacy theory is used to explain the impact of the program. Overall, the study provides empirical evidence to support including exposure to entrepreneurship education as an additional exposure variable in entrepreneurial intentions models. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice SAGE

Enterprise Education: Influencing Students’ Perceptions of Entrepreneurship

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References (31)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2003 SAGE Publications
ISSN
1042-2587
eISSN
1540-6520
DOI
10.1046/j.1540-6520.2003.00035.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This research examines the effect of participation in an enterprise education program on perceptions of the desirability and feasibility of starting a business. Changes in the perceptions of a sample of secondary school students enrolled in the Young Achievement Australia (YAA) enterprise program are analysed using a pre–test post–test control group research design. After completing the enterprise program, participants reported significantly higher perceptions of both desirability and feasibility. The degree of change in perceptions is related to the positiveness of prior experience and to the positiveness of the experience in the enterprise education program. Self–efficacy theory is used to explain the impact of the program. Overall, the study provides empirical evidence to support including exposure to entrepreneurship education as an additional exposure variable in entrepreneurial intentions models.

Journal

Entrepreneurship Theory and PracticeSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2003

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