Eisenberger, R., & Cameron, J. (1996). Detrimental effects of reward: Reality or myth? Journal of the American Psychological Association, 51, 1153-1166.

Eisenberger, R., & Cameron, J. (1996). Detrimental effects of reward: Reality or myth? Journal of... 55 Current LiteratureEisenberger, R., & Cameron, J. (1996). Detrimental effects of reward: Reality or myth? Journal of the American Psychological Association, 51, 1153-1166. SAGE Publications, Inc.1997DOI: 10.1177/108705479700200115 It has been increasingly recommended that due to their impulsive qualities, children with ADHD require prosthetic environments, ones in which consequences are provided immediately, predictably and over longer periods of time. Concerns have been raised over the past 40 years that the detrimental effects of too much reinforcement is that when reinforcement is removed, people engage in activities even less than they did before the reinforcement was introduced. This issue has been raised by critics of the approach to providing additional reinforcement for children with ADHD, suggesting it will not only "spoil them" but over time lead to a decrease rather than an increase in required behaviors. Eisenberger and Cameron conducted a meta-analysis. Their review of an accumulated body of research provided little evidence that reward reduces intrinsic task interest. The research suggests that if a person receives a tangible reward that depends on completing a task or meeting a standard of quality, when the reward is eliminated, the individual generally spends as much time in the activity as he did http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Attention Disorders SAGE

Eisenberger, R., & Cameron, J. (1996). Detrimental effects of reward: Reality or myth? Journal of the American Psychological Association, 51, 1153-1166.

Journal of Attention Disorders, Volume 2 (1) – Apr 1, 1997
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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1997 by SAGE Publications
ISSN
1087-0547
eISSN
1557-1246
D.O.I.
10.1177/108705479700200115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

55 Current LiteratureEisenberger, R., & Cameron, J. (1996). Detrimental effects of reward: Reality or myth? Journal of the American Psychological Association, 51, 1153-1166. SAGE Publications, Inc.1997DOI: 10.1177/108705479700200115 It has been increasingly recommended that due to their impulsive qualities, children with ADHD require prosthetic environments, ones in which consequences are provided immediately, predictably and over longer periods of time. Concerns have been raised over the past 40 years that the detrimental effects of too much reinforcement is that when reinforcement is removed, people engage in activities even less than they did before the reinforcement was introduced. This issue has been raised by critics of the approach to providing additional reinforcement for children with ADHD, suggesting it will not only "spoil them" but over time lead to a decrease rather than an increase in required behaviors. Eisenberger and Cameron conducted a meta-analysis. Their review of an accumulated body of research provided little evidence that reward reduces intrinsic task interest. The research suggests that if a person receives a tangible reward that depends on completing a task or meeting a standard of quality, when the reward is eliminated, the individual generally spends as much time in the activity as he did

Journal

Journal of Attention DisordersSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 1997

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