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Editor's Introduction

Editor's Introduction SAGE Publications, Inc.1979DOI: 10.1177/000276427902200302 Robert F.Rich Princeton University It is generally believed by scientists and decision makers that scientific information is greatly under-utilized. Policy makers do not believe that they are being exposed to the best quality information available; scientists generally believe that if the information they produced were used, public welfare and citizen well- being would be significantly increased. Furthermore, scientists feel that decision makers have access to information which they either do not understand and/or consciously reject in favor of what is politically acceptable and feasible. C. P. Snow characterized these differing beliefs as being reflective of two cultures-the culture of science and the culture of government. If this "gap" can be bridged, it has generally been assumed that greater and more effective utilization of scientific and technical information will follow. In addition to the two cultures hypothesis, several other explanations have been put forward to account for the relationship between the production (creation of knowledge and funding of research) and application of knowledge (including dissemination, processing. and utilization): . The incentive systems of researchers and decision makers differ significantly; thus, much of the information produced by scientists is, by definition, not likely to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Behavioral Scientist SAGE

Editor's Introduction

Abstract

Editor's Introduction SAGE Publications, Inc.1979DOI: 10.1177/000276427902200302 Robert F.Rich Princeton University It is generally believed by scientists and decision makers that scientific information is greatly under-utilized. Policy makers do not believe that they are being exposed to the best quality information available; scientists generally believe that if the information they produced were used, public welfare and citizen well- being would be significantly increased. Furthermore, scientists feel that decision makers have access to information which they either do not understand and/or consciously reject in favor of what is politically acceptable and feasible. C. P. Snow characterized these differing beliefs as being reflective of two cultures-the culture of science and the culture of government. If this "gap" can be bridged, it has generally been assumed that greater and more effective utilization of scientific and technical information will follow. In addition to the two cultures hypothesis, several other explanations have been put forward to account for the relationship between the production (creation of knowledge and funding of research) and application of knowledge (including dissemination, processing. and utilization): . The incentive systems of researchers and decision makers differ significantly; thus, much of the information produced by scientists is, by definition, not likely to
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