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Early Neglect and the Development of Aggression in Toddlerhood: The Role of Working Memory

Early Neglect and the Development of Aggression in Toddlerhood: The Role of Working Memory Previous research has provided evidence for the robust relation between maltreatment and the development of externalizing behavior, including aggression. However, less empirical attention has been given to the specific role of neglect. The current study aimed to examine the role of working memory in the association between early neglect and aggression in toddlerhood. Longitudinal data were collected from 89 infants and their biological mothers when the infant was approximately 12, 26, and 38 months old. History of neglect was assessed at 12 months using official Child Protective Service records. Working memory and mental development were assessed at 26 months. Aggression was measured using maternal report at 38 months. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling, and mediation was tested using 95% asymmetric confidence intervals. Results indicated that infants who experienced neglect exhibited poorer working memory abilities, specifically spatial working memory, and higher rates of aggression in toddlerhood. In addition, spatial working memory mediated the relation between neglect and aggression, suggesting that this may be one promising target for intervention. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Child Maltreatment SAGE

Early Neglect and the Development of Aggression in Toddlerhood: The Role of Working Memory

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References (77)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
1077-5595
eISSN
1552-6119
DOI
10.1177/1077559518778814
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous research has provided evidence for the robust relation between maltreatment and the development of externalizing behavior, including aggression. However, less empirical attention has been given to the specific role of neglect. The current study aimed to examine the role of working memory in the association between early neglect and aggression in toddlerhood. Longitudinal data were collected from 89 infants and their biological mothers when the infant was approximately 12, 26, and 38 months old. History of neglect was assessed at 12 months using official Child Protective Service records. Working memory and mental development were assessed at 26 months. Aggression was measured using maternal report at 38 months. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling, and mediation was tested using 95% asymmetric confidence intervals. Results indicated that infants who experienced neglect exhibited poorer working memory abilities, specifically spatial working memory, and higher rates of aggression in toddlerhood. In addition, spatial working memory mediated the relation between neglect and aggression, suggesting that this may be one promising target for intervention.

Journal

Child MaltreatmentSAGE

Published: Nov 1, 2018

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