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Do Smiles Elicit More Inferences than Do Frowns? The Effect of Emotional Valence on the Production of Spontaneous Inferences

Do Smiles Elicit More Inferences than Do Frowns? The Effect of Emotional Valence on the... Previous work by Liu, Karasawa, and Weiner suggests that perceivers may draw more causal attributions for positive emotions than for negative emotions. If so, then perceivers may draw more inferences spontaneously for positive emotions than for negative emotions. Participants observed a short video of a target who displayed either happiness or sadness. In the first experiment, half of the participants who viewed each of these behaviors were instructed to diagnose the target's disposition and half were instructed to diagnose the target's situation. Results revealed that although participants who viewed sadness drew only the inference consistent with their instructions, participants who viewed happiness drew both dispositional and situational inferences regardless of their instructions. In a second experiment, participants were instructed to diagnose the behavior of a target who displayed either happiness or sadness. Results revealed that perceivers of happy behavior drew inferences spontaneously. Implications are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin SAGE

Do Smiles Elicit More Inferences than Do Frowns? The Effect of Emotional Valence on the Production of Spontaneous Inferences

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References (42)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
Copyright © by SAGE Publications
ISSN
0146-1672
eISSN
1552-7433
DOI
10.1177/0146167298243006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous work by Liu, Karasawa, and Weiner suggests that perceivers may draw more causal attributions for positive emotions than for negative emotions. If so, then perceivers may draw more inferences spontaneously for positive emotions than for negative emotions. Participants observed a short video of a target who displayed either happiness or sadness. In the first experiment, half of the participants who viewed each of these behaviors were instructed to diagnose the target's disposition and half were instructed to diagnose the target's situation. Results revealed that although participants who viewed sadness drew only the inference consistent with their instructions, participants who viewed happiness drew both dispositional and situational inferences regardless of their instructions. In a second experiment, participants were instructed to diagnose the behavior of a target who displayed either happiness or sadness. Results revealed that perceivers of happy behavior drew inferences spontaneously. Implications are discussed.

Journal

Personality and Social Psychology BulletinSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 1998

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