Development and Preliminary Testing of the Perceived Benefit and Burden Scales for Cancer Clinical Trial Participation

Development and Preliminary Testing of the Perceived Benefit and Burden Scales for Cancer... We developed measures of benefits and burdens of research participation in cancer clinical trials using a sequential mixed methods design with a qualitative (n = 32) and quantitative sample (n = 110) of cancer clinical trial participants. Benefit–burden items (22 for benefits, 23 for burdens) were subsequently developed and assessed through cognitive interviewing for content, clarity, and meaning. Preliminary psychometric analyses support the internal consistency reliability and construct validity of Benefit (α = .90) and Burden (α = .87) research participation scales. Item response theory models supported the discrimination ability of the items on the scales. Participants who had thoughts of dropping out had lower Benefit scale scores (p < .001) and higher Burden scores (p < .001) than those who had no thoughts of dropping out, supporting construct validity. With further psychometric testing, the scale can be used to develop appropriate interventions to address recruitment and retention of human participants in clinical research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics SAGE

Development and Preliminary Testing of the Perceived Benefit and Burden Scales for Cancer Clinical Trial Participation

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/development-and-preliminary-testing-of-the-perceived-benefit-and-MiOtfJaw9P
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
1556-2646
eISSN
1556-2654
D.O.I.
10.1177/1556264618764730
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We developed measures of benefits and burdens of research participation in cancer clinical trials using a sequential mixed methods design with a qualitative (n = 32) and quantitative sample (n = 110) of cancer clinical trial participants. Benefit–burden items (22 for benefits, 23 for burdens) were subsequently developed and assessed through cognitive interviewing for content, clarity, and meaning. Preliminary psychometric analyses support the internal consistency reliability and construct validity of Benefit (α = .90) and Burden (α = .87) research participation scales. Item response theory models supported the discrimination ability of the items on the scales. Participants who had thoughts of dropping out had lower Benefit scale scores (p < .001) and higher Burden scores (p < .001) than those who had no thoughts of dropping out, supporting construct validity. With further psychometric testing, the scale can be used to develop appropriate interventions to address recruitment and retention of human participants in clinical research.

Journal

Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research EthicsSAGE

Published: Jul 1, 2018

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off