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Developing a Knowledge Strategy

Developing a Knowledge Strategy Developing a Knowledge Strategy Michael H. Zack usiness organizations are coming to view knowledge as their most valuable and strategic resource. They are realizing that to remain com- petitive they must explicitly manage their intellectual resources and B capabilities. To this end, many organizations have initiated a range of knowledge management projects and programs. The primary focus of these efforts has been on developing new applications of information technology to support the digital capture, storage, retrieval, and distribution of an organiza- tion’s explicitly documented knowledge. A smaller number of organizations, on the other hand, believe that the most valuable knowledge is the tacit knowl- edge existing within peoples’ heads, augmented or shared via interpersonal interaction and social relationships. To build their intellectual capital, those organizations are utilizing the “social capital” that develops from people inter- acting repeatedly over time. Many are experimenting with new organizational cultures, forms, and reward systems to enhance those social relationships. Technical and organizational initiatives, when aligned and integrated, can provide a comprehensive infrastructure to support knowledge management processes. However, while the appropriate infrastructure can enhance an organi- zation’s ability to create and exploit knowledge, it does not insure that the orga- nization is making http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png California Management Review SAGE

Developing a Knowledge Strategy

California Management Review , Volume 41 (3): 21 – Apr 1, 1999

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References (43)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 1999 The Regents of the University of California
ISSN
0008-1256
eISSN
2162-8564
DOI
10.2307/41166000
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Developing a Knowledge Strategy Michael H. Zack usiness organizations are coming to view knowledge as their most valuable and strategic resource. They are realizing that to remain com- petitive they must explicitly manage their intellectual resources and B capabilities. To this end, many organizations have initiated a range of knowledge management projects and programs. The primary focus of these efforts has been on developing new applications of information technology to support the digital capture, storage, retrieval, and distribution of an organiza- tion’s explicitly documented knowledge. A smaller number of organizations, on the other hand, believe that the most valuable knowledge is the tacit knowl- edge existing within peoples’ heads, augmented or shared via interpersonal interaction and social relationships. To build their intellectual capital, those organizations are utilizing the “social capital” that develops from people inter- acting repeatedly over time. Many are experimenting with new organizational cultures, forms, and reward systems to enhance those social relationships. Technical and organizational initiatives, when aligned and integrated, can provide a comprehensive infrastructure to support knowledge management processes. However, while the appropriate infrastructure can enhance an organi- zation’s ability to create and exploit knowledge, it does not insure that the orga- nization is making

Journal

California Management ReviewSAGE

Published: Apr 1, 1999

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