ConsolidAiT

ConsolidAiT InnovAiT, 11(6), 296 InnovAiT is produced on a 3-year cycle. However, many articles do not significantly go out of date in that time. This section of InnovAiT summarises articles from the previous cycle of InnovAiT that GPs and GPs in training might still find useful today. What is palliative care? The use of syringe drivers in palliative care can cause concern for GPs. This article considers indications for use and practical aspects, such as Dr Catherine Vincent opiate dose conversion. Your local palliative care team can help with InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 326–335 syringe driver prescriptions and drug dosing when converting from DOI: 10.1177/1755738015581025 oral medication. This special issue of InnovAiT considered palliative care: A core part of the GP role. This article explores where palliative care may begin and summarises guidance informing management. Early recognition Nutrition and palliative care that patients are in the last year of life can be especially difficult in Professor Max Watson and Dr Alison Rodgers non-malignant conditions but aids planning and communication. InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 354–359 DOI: 10.1177/1755738015581027 Ethics in palliative care Cachexia results from the catabolic processes in terminal illnesses and good nutrition is important at all stages of palliative care. However, Dr Conn Haughey and Professor Max Watson food supplements are often prescribed inappropriately when diet can InnovAiT 2015 8(6):336–339 be modified using normal foods. This article considers the nutritional DOI: 10.1177/1755738015574750 needs of patients in different stages of disease and recommends pre- Palliative care can present unique ethical dilemmas involving, for scribing supplements with advice from a dietitian. example, resuscitation, capacity, truth-telling and autonomy. This art- icle gives an overview of the ethics, law and professional responsibil- ity of palliative care dilemmas and how the four pillars of principilism, Rapid palliative discharge home respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice, can Dr Ian Warwick and Professor Max Watson help with ethical decision making. InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 360–363 DOI: 10.1177/1755738015579293 Prescribing in end of life care The key to successful discharge of patients to the community for pal- liative care is, as ever, good communication. This article considers Dr Rachel Campbell and Professor Max Watson ways to ensure that care is planned and co-ordinated to ensure trans- InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 340–347 fer of patients without compromising care and appropriate DOI: 10.1177/1755738015579434 medication. Prescribing in end of life care presents some unique difficulties and a good understanding of opioid prescribing, management of side effects and adjustments with, for example, renal impairment is essential for Self-care: Managing compassion fatigue the delivery of high-quality palliative care. This article references the Dr Louise McNutt and Professor Max Watson websites www.pallcare.info and www.palliativedrugs.com for infor- InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 364–367 mation on interactions and contraindications. DOI: 10.1177/1755738015581026 Looking after dying patients can place particular burdens on carers Syringe drivers and health professionals. Healthy doctors are likely to make better decisions. It is possible for GPs to neglect their own health. This article Dr Catherine Doherty and Professor Max Watson considers strategies to recognise and manage compassion fatigue for InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 349–353 the benefit of all concerned. DOI: 10.1177/1755738015579294 296 InnovAiT, 2018, Vol. 11(6), 296, ! The Author(s) 2018. DOI: 10.1177/1755738018762948 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav journals.sagepub.com/home/ino http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png InnovAiT: Education and inspiration for general practice SAGE
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Publisher
SAGE Publications
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
1755-7380
eISSN
1755-7399
D.O.I.
10.1177/1755738018762948
Publisher site
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Abstract

InnovAiT, 11(6), 296 InnovAiT is produced on a 3-year cycle. However, many articles do not significantly go out of date in that time. This section of InnovAiT summarises articles from the previous cycle of InnovAiT that GPs and GPs in training might still find useful today. What is palliative care? The use of syringe drivers in palliative care can cause concern for GPs. This article considers indications for use and practical aspects, such as Dr Catherine Vincent opiate dose conversion. Your local palliative care team can help with InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 326–335 syringe driver prescriptions and drug dosing when converting from DOI: 10.1177/1755738015581025 oral medication. This special issue of InnovAiT considered palliative care: A core part of the GP role. This article explores where palliative care may begin and summarises guidance informing management. Early recognition Nutrition and palliative care that patients are in the last year of life can be especially difficult in Professor Max Watson and Dr Alison Rodgers non-malignant conditions but aids planning and communication. InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 354–359 DOI: 10.1177/1755738015581027 Ethics in palliative care Cachexia results from the catabolic processes in terminal illnesses and good nutrition is important at all stages of palliative care. However, Dr Conn Haughey and Professor Max Watson food supplements are often prescribed inappropriately when diet can InnovAiT 2015 8(6):336–339 be modified using normal foods. This article considers the nutritional DOI: 10.1177/1755738015574750 needs of patients in different stages of disease and recommends pre- Palliative care can present unique ethical dilemmas involving, for scribing supplements with advice from a dietitian. example, resuscitation, capacity, truth-telling and autonomy. This art- icle gives an overview of the ethics, law and professional responsibil- ity of palliative care dilemmas and how the four pillars of principilism, Rapid palliative discharge home respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice, can Dr Ian Warwick and Professor Max Watson help with ethical decision making. InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 360–363 DOI: 10.1177/1755738015579293 Prescribing in end of life care The key to successful discharge of patients to the community for pal- liative care is, as ever, good communication. This article considers Dr Rachel Campbell and Professor Max Watson ways to ensure that care is planned and co-ordinated to ensure trans- InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 340–347 fer of patients without compromising care and appropriate DOI: 10.1177/1755738015579434 medication. Prescribing in end of life care presents some unique difficulties and a good understanding of opioid prescribing, management of side effects and adjustments with, for example, renal impairment is essential for Self-care: Managing compassion fatigue the delivery of high-quality palliative care. This article references the Dr Louise McNutt and Professor Max Watson websites www.pallcare.info and www.palliativedrugs.com for infor- InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 364–367 mation on interactions and contraindications. DOI: 10.1177/1755738015581026 Looking after dying patients can place particular burdens on carers Syringe drivers and health professionals. Healthy doctors are likely to make better decisions. It is possible for GPs to neglect their own health. This article Dr Catherine Doherty and Professor Max Watson considers strategies to recognise and manage compassion fatigue for InnovAiT 2015 8(6): 349–353 the benefit of all concerned. DOI: 10.1177/1755738015579294 296 InnovAiT, 2018, Vol. 11(6), 296, ! The Author(s) 2018. DOI: 10.1177/1755738018762948 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav journals.sagepub.com/home/ino

Journal

InnovAiT: Education and inspiration for general practiceSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2018

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