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College Comes to High School: Participation and Performance in Tennessee’s Innovative Wave of Dual-Credit Courses

College Comes to High School: Participation and Performance in Tennessee’s Innovative Wave of... We analyze the rollout of a Statewide Dual-Credit (SDC) program intended to expand access to college-level courses during high school. We find that SDC increased early postsecondary course-taking among students in the middle of the achievement distribution, especially through courses in vocational subjects, without decreasing participation in Advanced Placement (AP). However, SDC was mostly offered by schools already providing courses in similar subject areas and was less frequently offered in small relative to large schools, thus doing little to ameliorate placed-based gaps in course-taking opportunities. Furthermore, a majority of students failed the end-of-course exams necessary to secure college credit, and those who passed closely resemble students who pass AP exams. Low SDC exam pass rates predict school-level discontinuation of SDC courses over and above a range of other factors that reflect student demand and staffing capacity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis SAGE

College Comes to High School: Participation and Performance in Tennessee’s Innovative Wave of Dual-Credit Courses

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2021 AERA
ISSN
0162-3737
eISSN
1935-1062
DOI
10.3102/01623737211052310
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We analyze the rollout of a Statewide Dual-Credit (SDC) program intended to expand access to college-level courses during high school. We find that SDC increased early postsecondary course-taking among students in the middle of the achievement distribution, especially through courses in vocational subjects, without decreasing participation in Advanced Placement (AP). However, SDC was mostly offered by schools already providing courses in similar subject areas and was less frequently offered in small relative to large schools, thus doing little to ameliorate placed-based gaps in course-taking opportunities. Furthermore, a majority of students failed the end-of-course exams necessary to secure college credit, and those who passed closely resemble students who pass AP exams. Low SDC exam pass rates predict school-level discontinuation of SDC courses over and above a range of other factors that reflect student demand and staffing capacity.

Journal

Educational Evaluation and Policy AnalysisSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2022

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