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Canadian Circumstances: The Evolution of Canada's Climate Change Policy

Canadian Circumstances: The Evolution of Canada's Climate Change Policy A tracing and analysis of Canadian climate change policies and international negotiation positions over the past two decades reveals more than the complexity involved in the subject itself. Indeed, analysis suggests that “national circumstances” have consistently been the primary driver of Canada's climate change policy. These circumstances include a decentralized national policy system that necessitates broad governmental and stakeholder participation; a strong economic reliance on natural and energy-intensive resources and exports; a national sense of belonging to the land; and a tradition of leadership and brokering in international affairs. Canada's policies have been, and will continue to be, primarily driven by these national circumstances as negotiations and implementation issues around the Kyoto Protocol further evolve. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Energy & Environment SAGE

Canadian Circumstances: The Evolution of Canada's Climate Change Policy

Energy & Environment , Volume 12 (2-3): 17 – Mar 1, 2001

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References (1)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2001 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0958-305X
eISSN
2048-4070
DOI
10.1260/0958305011500706
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A tracing and analysis of Canadian climate change policies and international negotiation positions over the past two decades reveals more than the complexity involved in the subject itself. Indeed, analysis suggests that “national circumstances” have consistently been the primary driver of Canada's climate change policy. These circumstances include a decentralized national policy system that necessitates broad governmental and stakeholder participation; a strong economic reliance on natural and energy-intensive resources and exports; a national sense of belonging to the land; and a tradition of leadership and brokering in international affairs. Canada's policies have been, and will continue to be, primarily driven by these national circumstances as negotiations and implementation issues around the Kyoto Protocol further evolve.

Journal

Energy & EnvironmentSAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2001

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