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Book Review: The Mestizo Augustine: A Theologian between Two Cultures

Book Review: The Mestizo Augustine: A Theologian between Two Cultures ATR/100.2 Book Reviews 413 You do not need to be Catholic to be inspired by this work. The interior landscape is compelling enough to reach anyone with even the faintest meta- physical inclination. “There lives the dearest freshness deep down things,” Hopkins says, and these poems rediscover this freshness, this Christ renewal, in people too. Janet McCann Texas A&M University College Station, Texas The Mestizo Augustine: A Theologian between Two Cultures. By Justo L. González. Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity Press, 2016. 175 pp. $24.00 (paper). Students of Augustine are used to seeing him represented as the white European thinker and mystic painted by the likes of Botticello, Carpaccio, de Champaigne, Gozzoli, de Ribera, or Rodríguez. Few introductory works on Augustine disabuse the reader of this apparently racialized iconography. Yet it is widely acknowledged that Augustine was probably of indigenous (what would later be called Berber) ethnicity, at least on his mother’s side. He once described himself as “Punic,” by which he probably meant the in- digenous people of the area. They are likely to have been of varied skin tone. It is possible, as the classicist Rebecca Futo Kennedy points out in her blog, that Augustine was black. These http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Anglican Theological Review SAGE

Book Review: The Mestizo Augustine: A Theologian between Two Cultures

Anglican Theological Review , Volume 100 (2): 1 – Aug 25, 2021

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2018 Anglican Theological Review Corporation
ISSN
0003-3286
eISSN
2163-6214
DOI
10.1177/000332861810000223
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ATR/100.2 Book Reviews 413 You do not need to be Catholic to be inspired by this work. The interior landscape is compelling enough to reach anyone with even the faintest meta- physical inclination. “There lives the dearest freshness deep down things,” Hopkins says, and these poems rediscover this freshness, this Christ renewal, in people too. Janet McCann Texas A&M University College Station, Texas The Mestizo Augustine: A Theologian between Two Cultures. By Justo L. González. Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity Press, 2016. 175 pp. $24.00 (paper). Students of Augustine are used to seeing him represented as the white European thinker and mystic painted by the likes of Botticello, Carpaccio, de Champaigne, Gozzoli, de Ribera, or Rodríguez. Few introductory works on Augustine disabuse the reader of this apparently racialized iconography. Yet it is widely acknowledged that Augustine was probably of indigenous (what would later be called Berber) ethnicity, at least on his mother’s side. He once described himself as “Punic,” by which he probably meant the in- digenous people of the area. They are likely to have been of varied skin tone. It is possible, as the classicist Rebecca Futo Kennedy points out in her blog, that Augustine was black. These

Journal

Anglican Theological ReviewSAGE

Published: Aug 25, 2021

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