Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Book Review: More than medicine: A history of the feminist women’s health movement

Book Review: More than medicine: A history of the feminist women’s health movement Bool Reviews 417 continuation and efficacy but are underutilized in the United States due to a lack of information, the reluctance of health-care providers to suggest them, the initial cost, and myths associated with them which have their genesis with medical complications from the Dalkon Shield in the 1950s. Sawhill states that providing women with both the means and the information is critical in creating an “era in which all children are wanted and born to parents ready to raise them” (p. 128). Sawhill explores that over half of all births (70%) to young single women in the United States now occur outside of marriage and that unplanned pregnancies are resulting in women predomi- nantly in their 20s drifting into parenthood rather than planning for it. She questions if marriage as a model is gone forever replaced by new forms of sex and dating including online dating and “hooking up” a term that denotes sexual contact without “the emotional entanglement of a relationship” (p. 22). While the left argues for more social support for unmarried parents, the right argues for a return to traditional marriage. Sawhill recommends a third approach in the position that the government should be doing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work SAGE

Book Review: More than medicine: A history of the feminist women’s health movement

Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work , Volume 32 (3): 2 – Aug 1, 2017

Loading next page...
 
/lp/sage/book-review-more-than-medicine-a-history-of-the-feminist-women-s-5uGCV0ziIK
Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2017
ISSN
0886-1099
eISSN
1552-3020
DOI
10.1177/0886109917690851
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bool Reviews 417 continuation and efficacy but are underutilized in the United States due to a lack of information, the reluctance of health-care providers to suggest them, the initial cost, and myths associated with them which have their genesis with medical complications from the Dalkon Shield in the 1950s. Sawhill states that providing women with both the means and the information is critical in creating an “era in which all children are wanted and born to parents ready to raise them” (p. 128). Sawhill explores that over half of all births (70%) to young single women in the United States now occur outside of marriage and that unplanned pregnancies are resulting in women predomi- nantly in their 20s drifting into parenthood rather than planning for it. She questions if marriage as a model is gone forever replaced by new forms of sex and dating including online dating and “hooking up” a term that denotes sexual contact without “the emotional entanglement of a relationship” (p. 22). While the left argues for more social support for unmarried parents, the right argues for a return to traditional marriage. Sawhill recommends a third approach in the position that the government should be doing

Journal

Affilia: Journal of Women and Social WorkSAGE

Published: Aug 1, 2017

There are no references for this article.