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Between Expectancy and Experience: Testing a Model of Childbirth Satisfaction

Between Expectancy and Experience: Testing a Model of Childbirth Satisfaction Childbirth is a pivotal event for many women, and evidence suggests that women possess strong expectations regarding this experience. In a longitudinal study of 330 Israeli first-time mothers, we distinguished between physical, emotional, and cognitive factors and used them to assess the underlying mechanism of satisfaction, based on theoretical frameworks of stress and control. Women completed questionnaires during pregnancy and two months postpartum. The negative association between a more medicalized birth and birth satisfaction was partially mediated by perceived control. In turn, specific emotions mediated the association between perceived control and satisfaction: Greater perceived control over the birth environment predicted more positive emotions, less fear, and better perceived care; while greater perceived control over the birth process predicted more positive emotions, less fear, and less guilt. Greater incongruence between the planned and actual birth experience predicted lower satisfaction, mediated by perceived care and feelings of guilt. This investigation unraveled the association between women’s lived birth experience and their birth satisfaction. The findings underscore the value of helping women achieve satisfying births by discussing their expectations with them, providing them with experiences that meet their needs, and supporting those with a gap between their expectations and experience. Respecting individual preferences while lowering blame may improve women’s health and well-being. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ’s website at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/10.1177/0361684318779537. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychology of Women Quarterly SAGE

Between Expectancy and Experience: Testing a Model of Childbirth Satisfaction

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References (60)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2018
ISSN
0361-6843
eISSN
1471-6402
DOI
10.1177/0361684318779537
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Childbirth is a pivotal event for many women, and evidence suggests that women possess strong expectations regarding this experience. In a longitudinal study of 330 Israeli first-time mothers, we distinguished between physical, emotional, and cognitive factors and used them to assess the underlying mechanism of satisfaction, based on theoretical frameworks of stress and control. Women completed questionnaires during pregnancy and two months postpartum. The negative association between a more medicalized birth and birth satisfaction was partially mediated by perceived control. In turn, specific emotions mediated the association between perceived control and satisfaction: Greater perceived control over the birth environment predicted more positive emotions, less fear, and better perceived care; while greater perceived control over the birth process predicted more positive emotions, less fear, and less guilt. Greater incongruence between the planned and actual birth experience predicted lower satisfaction, mediated by perceived care and feelings of guilt. This investigation unraveled the association between women’s lived birth experience and their birth satisfaction. The findings underscore the value of helping women achieve satisfying births by discussing their expectations with them, providing them with experiences that meet their needs, and supporting those with a gap between their expectations and experience. Respecting individual preferences while lowering blame may improve women’s health and well-being. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ’s website at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/10.1177/0361684318779537.

Journal

Psychology of Women QuarterlySAGE

Published: Mar 1, 2019

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