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A Tale of Two Cities: Variations in Perceptions of Disaster Recovery and the Importance of Intersectionality

A Tale of Two Cities: Variations in Perceptions of Disaster Recovery and the Importance of... In this article, the author examines long-term recovery from disaster in Joplin, Missouri, and Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Tornados devastated both cities in 2011. The author asks (1) how sociohistoric contexts influenced perceptions of recovery and (2) how perceptions of recovery vary within and across social groups and geographic contexts. This research is based on fieldwork that spans 2013 to 2016, archival data, and 162 interviews. There are three main findings. First, although most White residents in both cities narrate a lasting leveling effect, people of color in both locations repudiate that claim. Second, White residents in Joplin explain their recovery in colorblind racist ways, while Tuscaloosa residents do not. Third, the author shows the ways in which social class intersects with gender and race to produce particular perspectives. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sociology of Race and Ethnicity SAGE

A Tale of Two Cities: Variations in Perceptions of Disaster Recovery and the Importance of Intersectionality

Sociology of Race and Ethnicity , Volume 3 (4): 16 – Oct 1, 2017

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Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© American Sociological Association 2017
ISSN
2332-6492
eISSN
2332-6506
DOI
10.1177/2332649217702659
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article, the author examines long-term recovery from disaster in Joplin, Missouri, and Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Tornados devastated both cities in 2011. The author asks (1) how sociohistoric contexts influenced perceptions of recovery and (2) how perceptions of recovery vary within and across social groups and geographic contexts. This research is based on fieldwork that spans 2013 to 2016, archival data, and 162 interviews. There are three main findings. First, although most White residents in both cities narrate a lasting leveling effect, people of color in both locations repudiate that claim. Second, White residents in Joplin explain their recovery in colorblind racist ways, while Tuscaloosa residents do not. Third, the author shows the ways in which social class intersects with gender and race to produce particular perspectives.

Journal

Sociology of Race and EthnicitySAGE

Published: Oct 1, 2017

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