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A Critique of Conventional CSR Theory: An SME Perspective

A Critique of Conventional CSR Theory: An SME Perspective Journal of General Management Vol. 29 No. 4 Summer 2004 A Critique of Conventional CSR Theory: An SME Perspective by Heledd Jenkins How can small and medium enterprises embrace corporate social responsibility? Over the last couple of decades Small and Medium Sized Enterprises [1] (SMEs) have become more important both numerically and economically, a trend that is set to be maintained. SMEs make up over 90 per cent of businesses worldwide and account for between 50 and 60 per cent of employment [2]. A report by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor shows that Chile, Korea, New Zealand, Uganda and Venezuela are emerging as among the most entrepreneurial countries in the world, and that more than 80 per cent of entrepreneurs throughout the 41 countries studied expect to create new jobs within the next five years [3]. Given the significant scale of small business in nearly every economy, their aggregate achievements have a major effect worldwide. SMEs have multiple roles; they may be seen as innovators (or laggards) in the life-cycle of particular technologies, as a mechanism for privatisation of state-owned enterprises, as a response to global competition, or as a device for economic regeneration [4]. Also, over the last decade, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of General Management SAGE

A Critique of Conventional CSR Theory: An SME Perspective

Journal of General Management , Volume 29 (4): 21 – Jun 1, 2004

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References (53)

Publisher
SAGE
Copyright
© 2004 SAGE Publications
ISSN
0306-3070
eISSN
1759-6106
DOI
10.1177/030630700402900403
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of General Management Vol. 29 No. 4 Summer 2004 A Critique of Conventional CSR Theory: An SME Perspective by Heledd Jenkins How can small and medium enterprises embrace corporate social responsibility? Over the last couple of decades Small and Medium Sized Enterprises [1] (SMEs) have become more important both numerically and economically, a trend that is set to be maintained. SMEs make up over 90 per cent of businesses worldwide and account for between 50 and 60 per cent of employment [2]. A report by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor shows that Chile, Korea, New Zealand, Uganda and Venezuela are emerging as among the most entrepreneurial countries in the world, and that more than 80 per cent of entrepreneurs throughout the 41 countries studied expect to create new jobs within the next five years [3]. Given the significant scale of small business in nearly every economy, their aggregate achievements have a major effect worldwide. SMEs have multiple roles; they may be seen as innovators (or laggards) in the life-cycle of particular technologies, as a mechanism for privatisation of state-owned enterprises, as a response to global competition, or as a device for economic regeneration [4]. Also, over the last decade,

Journal

Journal of General ManagementSAGE

Published: Jun 1, 2004

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