Role of flower-like ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets in water splitting and non-aqueous LiO2 batteriesElectronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c8nr02376j

Role of flower-like ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets in water splitting and non-aqueous LiO2... The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are both fundamental and essential processes for various energy conversion and storage systems. The kinetics of ORR and OER play a critical role in their energy efficiency and practicality. Here, flower-like ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets synthesized through a facile solvothermal technique were studied as a bifunctional catalyst for both water splitting and non-aqueous LiO2 batteries. Due to the novel structure and highly active {110} and {100} exposed facets, which can effectively facilitate mass transfer and enhance catalytic capability, Co3O4 nanosheets exhibit better stability and higher ORR/OER activity than Co3O4 nanoparticles, Co3O4 bulks, Pt/C, and RuO2 in alkaline solution. More importantly, LiO2 batteries with ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets catalyst can enhance the initial discharge capacity from 6400 to 8600 mA h g1 and improve the cyclability up to 160 cycles at 500 mA g1. Unexpectedly, XRD and UV/Vis techniques suggest that the main product in Co3O4 nanosheets based cathodes is LiOH, with resulting LiOH also demonstrating reversible formation/decomposition behavior, rather than Li2O2 in pure Super P based cathodes. Further investigation confirms that Co3O4 can also catalyze the electrolyte decomposition responsible for the formation of LiOH, and a reaction mechanism was illustrated. This work highlights that the traditional high-efficiency bifunctional catalyst in aqueous media may not be suitable for non-aqueous LiO2 batteries, and the effect of catalyst on electrolyte besides the discharge product should also be carefully considered for the design of more stable and practical LiO2 systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nanoscale Royal Society of Chemistry

Role of flower-like ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets in water splitting and non-aqueous LiO2 batteriesElectronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c8nr02376j

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Publisher
The Royal Society of Chemistry
Copyright
This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN
2040-3364
D.O.I.
10.1039/c8nr02376j
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are both fundamental and essential processes for various energy conversion and storage systems. The kinetics of ORR and OER play a critical role in their energy efficiency and practicality. Here, flower-like ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets synthesized through a facile solvothermal technique were studied as a bifunctional catalyst for both water splitting and non-aqueous LiO2 batteries. Due to the novel structure and highly active {110} and {100} exposed facets, which can effectively facilitate mass transfer and enhance catalytic capability, Co3O4 nanosheets exhibit better stability and higher ORR/OER activity than Co3O4 nanoparticles, Co3O4 bulks, Pt/C, and RuO2 in alkaline solution. More importantly, LiO2 batteries with ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets catalyst can enhance the initial discharge capacity from 6400 to 8600 mA h g1 and improve the cyclability up to 160 cycles at 500 mA g1. Unexpectedly, XRD and UV/Vis techniques suggest that the main product in Co3O4 nanosheets based cathodes is LiOH, with resulting LiOH also demonstrating reversible formation/decomposition behavior, rather than Li2O2 in pure Super P based cathodes. Further investigation confirms that Co3O4 can also catalyze the electrolyte decomposition responsible for the formation of LiOH, and a reaction mechanism was illustrated. This work highlights that the traditional high-efficiency bifunctional catalyst in aqueous media may not be suitable for non-aqueous LiO2 batteries, and the effect of catalyst on electrolyte besides the discharge product should also be carefully considered for the design of more stable and practical LiO2 systems.

Journal

NanoscaleRoyal Society of Chemistry

Published: May 23, 2018

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