Cobalt-catalysed alkene hydrogenation: a metallacycle can explain the hydroxyl activating effect and the diastereoselectivityElectronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Computational and experimental details, calculated reaction profiles, optimised coordinates, NMR and X-ray data. See DOI: 10.1039/c8sc01315b

Cobalt-catalysed alkene hydrogenation: a metallacycle can explain the hydroxyl activating effect... Bis(phosphine)cobalt dialkyl complexes have been reported to be highly active in the hydrogenation of tri-substituted alkenes bearing hydroxyl substituents. Alkene substrates containing ether, ester, or ketone substituents show minimal reactivity, indicating an activating effect of the hydroxyl group. The mechanistic details of bis(phosphine)cobalt-catalysed hydrogenation were recently evaluated computationally (X. Ma, M. Lei, J. Org. Chem. 2017, 82, 27032712) and a Co(0)Co(ii) redox mechanism was proposed. However, the activating effect of the hydroxyl substituent and the accompanying high diastereoselectivity were not studied. Here we report a computational study rationalizing the role of the hydroxyl group through a key metallacycle species. The metallacycle is part of a non-redox catalytic pathway proceeding through Co(ii) intermediates throughout. The preference for alcohol over ether substrates and the high diastereoselectivity of terpinen-4-ol hydrogenation are correctly predicted in computations adopting the new pathway, whereas the alternative redox mechanism predicts ethers rather than alcohols to be more reactive substrates. Additional experimental evidence supports the role of the hydroxyl group in the metallacycle mechanism. Our work highlights the importance of employing known substrate preferences and stereoselectivities to test the validity of computationally proposed reaction pathways. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Chemical Science Royal Society of Chemistry

Cobalt-catalysed alkene hydrogenation: a metallacycle can explain the hydroxyl activating effect and the diastereoselectivityElectronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Computational and experimental details, calculated reaction profiles, optimised coordinates, NMR and X-ray data. See DOI: 10.1039/c8sc01315b

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Publisher
The Royal Society of Chemistry
Copyright
This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN
2041-6520
D.O.I.
10.1039/c8sc01315b
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bis(phosphine)cobalt dialkyl complexes have been reported to be highly active in the hydrogenation of tri-substituted alkenes bearing hydroxyl substituents. Alkene substrates containing ether, ester, or ketone substituents show minimal reactivity, indicating an activating effect of the hydroxyl group. The mechanistic details of bis(phosphine)cobalt-catalysed hydrogenation were recently evaluated computationally (X. Ma, M. Lei, J. Org. Chem. 2017, 82, 27032712) and a Co(0)Co(ii) redox mechanism was proposed. However, the activating effect of the hydroxyl substituent and the accompanying high diastereoselectivity were not studied. Here we report a computational study rationalizing the role of the hydroxyl group through a key metallacycle species. The metallacycle is part of a non-redox catalytic pathway proceeding through Co(ii) intermediates throughout. The preference for alcohol over ether substrates and the high diastereoselectivity of terpinen-4-ol hydrogenation are correctly predicted in computations adopting the new pathway, whereas the alternative redox mechanism predicts ethers rather than alcohols to be more reactive substrates. Additional experimental evidence supports the role of the hydroxyl group in the metallacycle mechanism. Our work highlights the importance of employing known substrate preferences and stereoselectivities to test the validity of computationally proposed reaction pathways.

Journal

Chemical ScienceRoyal Society of Chemistry

Published: May 11, 2018

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