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The positive muon and μSR spectroscopy: powerful tools for investigating the structure and dynamics of free radicals and spin probes in complex systems

The positive muon and μSR spectroscopy: powerful tools for investigating the structure and... The positive muon (μ + ) can be incorporated into free radicals where it acts as a probe of the structure and dynamics. The muoniated radicals are characterized by a series of magnetic resonance techniques known as μSR for muon spin rotation, resonance and relaxation spectroscopy. In this review it is shown how μSR can be used to obtain information about the structure, dynamics, and local environments of transient radicals in solids like zeolites, in solution or even in exotic solvents like supercritical water. It will also be demonstrated that muoniated radicals can be used as probes in complex systems, such as rod-like and discotic liquid crystals, bilayers and polymers, where they have advantages over traditional spin labelling. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Reports Section "C" (Physical Chemistry) Royal Society of Chemistry

The positive muon and μSR spectroscopy: powerful tools for investigating the structure and dynamics of free radicals and spin probes in complex systems

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Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
Copyright
This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN
0260-1826
eISSN
1460-4787
DOI
10.1039/c3pc90005c
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The positive muon (μ + ) can be incorporated into free radicals where it acts as a probe of the structure and dynamics. The muoniated radicals are characterized by a series of magnetic resonance techniques known as μSR for muon spin rotation, resonance and relaxation spectroscopy. In this review it is shown how μSR can be used to obtain information about the structure, dynamics, and local environments of transient radicals in solids like zeolites, in solution or even in exotic solvents like supercritical water. It will also be demonstrated that muoniated radicals can be used as probes in complex systems, such as rod-like and discotic liquid crystals, bilayers and polymers, where they have advantages over traditional spin labelling.

Journal

Annual Reports Section "C" (Physical Chemistry)Royal Society of Chemistry

Published: May 30, 2013

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