Sodium metavanadate exhibits carcinogenic tendencies in vitro in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells

Sodium metavanadate exhibits carcinogenic tendencies in vitro in immortalized human bronchial... Pentavalent vanadium compounds induce intracellular changes in vitro that are consistent with those of other carcinogenic substances. While there is no clear evidence that vanadium compounds cause cancer in humans, vanadium pentoxide causes lung cancer in rodents after long-term inhalation exposures and in turn IARC has categorized it as a group 2B possible human carcinogen. The goal of this study was to investigate the carcinogenicity of NaVO 3 in the human immortalized bronchial epithelial cell line, Beas-2B. Cells were treated with 10 μM NaVO 3 for 5 weeks, with or without recovery time, followed by gene expression microarray analysis. In a separate experiment, cells were exposed to 1–10 μM NaVO 3 for 4 weeks and then grown in soft agar to test for anchorage-independent growth. A dose-dependent increase in the number of colonies was observed. In scratch tests, NaVO 3 -transformed clones could repair a wound faster than controls. In a gene expression microarray analysis of soft agar clones there were 2010 differentially expressed genes (DEG) (adjusted p -value ≤ 0.05) in NaVO 3 -transformed clones relative to control clones. DEG from this experiment were compared with the DEG of 5 week NaVO 3 exposure with or without recovery, all with adjusted p -values < 0.05, and 469 genes were altered in the same direction for transformed clones, 5 week NaVO 3 -treated cells, and the recovered cells. The data from this study imply that chronic exposure to NaVO 3 causes changes that are consistent with cellular transformation including anchorage-independent growth, enhanced migration ability, and gene expression changes that were likely epigenetically inherited. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Metallomics Royal Society of Chemistry

Sodium metavanadate exhibits carcinogenic tendencies in vitro in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells

Metallomics, Volume 5 (10) – Aug 5, 2013

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Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
Copyright
This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN
1756-5901
eISSN
1756-591X
DOI
10.1039/c3mt00149k
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Pentavalent vanadium compounds induce intracellular changes in vitro that are consistent with those of other carcinogenic substances. While there is no clear evidence that vanadium compounds cause cancer in humans, vanadium pentoxide causes lung cancer in rodents after long-term inhalation exposures and in turn IARC has categorized it as a group 2B possible human carcinogen. The goal of this study was to investigate the carcinogenicity of NaVO 3 in the human immortalized bronchial epithelial cell line, Beas-2B. Cells were treated with 10 μM NaVO 3 for 5 weeks, with or without recovery time, followed by gene expression microarray analysis. In a separate experiment, cells were exposed to 1–10 μM NaVO 3 for 4 weeks and then grown in soft agar to test for anchorage-independent growth. A dose-dependent increase in the number of colonies was observed. In scratch tests, NaVO 3 -transformed clones could repair a wound faster than controls. In a gene expression microarray analysis of soft agar clones there were 2010 differentially expressed genes (DEG) (adjusted p -value ≤ 0.05) in NaVO 3 -transformed clones relative to control clones. DEG from this experiment were compared with the DEG of 5 week NaVO 3 exposure with or without recovery, all with adjusted p -values < 0.05, and 469 genes were altered in the same direction for transformed clones, 5 week NaVO 3 -treated cells, and the recovered cells. The data from this study imply that chronic exposure to NaVO 3 causes changes that are consistent with cellular transformation including anchorage-independent growth, enhanced migration ability, and gene expression changes that were likely epigenetically inherited.

Journal

MetallomicsRoyal Society of Chemistry

Published: Aug 5, 2013

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