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Predicting solvation energies for kinetic modeling

Predicting solvation energies for kinetic modeling Ab initio and empirical methods for predicting solvation energies are reviewed, focusing on the challenge of predicting the solvation energies of reactive low-concentration species (and transition states) needed for kinetic models. Several rather different approaches are being pursued with success, but none of the purely a priori methods have yet achieved the accuracy needed to quantitatively predict solution-phase kinetics. Empirical methods are quite accurate at predicting the variation of a molecule’s solvation energy with changes in solvent. Some a priori approaches based on these empirical methods are discussed. Several effects which are poorly-predicted by existing a priori methods and need further work are highlighted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Reports Section "C" (Physical Chemistry) Royal Society of Chemistry

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Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
Copyright
This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN
0260-1826
eISSN
1460-4787
DOI
10.1039/b811056p
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ab initio and empirical methods for predicting solvation energies are reviewed, focusing on the challenge of predicting the solvation energies of reactive low-concentration species (and transition states) needed for kinetic models. Several rather different approaches are being pursued with success, but none of the purely a priori methods have yet achieved the accuracy needed to quantitatively predict solution-phase kinetics. Empirical methods are quite accurate at predicting the variation of a molecule’s solvation energy with changes in solvent. Some a priori approaches based on these empirical methods are discussed. Several effects which are poorly-predicted by existing a priori methods and need further work are highlighted.

Journal

Annual Reports Section "C" (Physical Chemistry)Royal Society of Chemistry

Published: May 25, 2010

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