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ECL—Electrochemical luminescence

ECL—Electrochemical luminescence Electrochemical luminescence (ECL) is the process where species generated at electrodes undergo electron transfer reactions to form excited states that emit light. Application of a voltage to an electrode in the presence of an organic or inorganic luminophore, such as diphenylanthracene (DPA) or Ru(bpy) 3 2+ (where bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine), results in light emission. By employing ECL-active species as labels on biological molecules, ECL has found application in commercial instruments to detect many clinically relevant analytes ( e.g. , immunoassays and DNA probes) at sub-picomolar concentrations. The principles, ECL emitting systems and applications are outlined in this review with a focus on discoveries made in the past few years. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Reports Section "C" (Physical Chemistry) Royal Society of Chemistry

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Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
Copyright
This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN
0260-1826
eISSN
1460-4787
DOI
10.1039/b605635k
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Electrochemical luminescence (ECL) is the process where species generated at electrodes undergo electron transfer reactions to form excited states that emit light. Application of a voltage to an electrode in the presence of an organic or inorganic luminophore, such as diphenylanthracene (DPA) or Ru(bpy) 3 2+ (where bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine), results in light emission. By employing ECL-active species as labels on biological molecules, ECL has found application in commercial instruments to detect many clinically relevant analytes ( e.g. , immunoassays and DNA probes) at sub-picomolar concentrations. The principles, ECL emitting systems and applications are outlined in this review with a focus on discoveries made in the past few years.

Journal

Annual Reports Section "C" (Physical Chemistry)Royal Society of Chemistry

Published: Apr 13, 2007

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