Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

3 Gas-phase molecular spectroscopy

3 Gas-phase molecular spectroscopy Gas-phase molecular spectroscopy P. Crozet,a A. J. Ross a and M. Vervloet b Laboratoire de Spectrométrie Ionique et Moléculaire, Université Lyon I et CNRS (UMR 5579), Bâtiment A. Kastler, Campus La Doua, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France b Laboratoire de Photophysique Moléculaire du CNRS (UPR 3361), Université Paris Sud, Bâtiment 350, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France Introduction This chapter follows the style of earlier reviews on the same subject, written by R. F. Barrow * and his co-authors in previous years. It is intended to give an overview of a vast subject, which spans a large section of the electromagnetic spectrum and invokes diverse experimental techniques to investigate systems ranging from diatomics to large organic and even biological molecules. We also supply references to recent work for further information. The impression is that combinations of existing experimental techniques are proving particularly fruitful at the moment, and that the complicity between theoretical chemistry and experimental spectroscopy has reached an even balance, since simulated spectra are commonly presented alongside the measurements made on systems of ever increasing complexity. Spectroscopy continues to serve as an experimental probe requiring and furnishing reliable frequency standards; the volume of information is always on the increase. Data http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Reports Section "C" (Physical Chemistry) Royal Society of Chemistry

Loading next page...
 
/lp/royal-society-of-chemistry/3-gas-phase-molecular-spectroscopy-aiLFr7MKmR
Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry
Copyright
This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry
ISSN
0260-1826
eISSN
1460-4787
DOI
10.1039/b201321p
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Gas-phase molecular spectroscopy P. Crozet,a A. J. Ross a and M. Vervloet b Laboratoire de Spectrométrie Ionique et Moléculaire, Université Lyon I et CNRS (UMR 5579), Bâtiment A. Kastler, Campus La Doua, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France b Laboratoire de Photophysique Moléculaire du CNRS (UPR 3361), Université Paris Sud, Bâtiment 350, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France Introduction This chapter follows the style of earlier reviews on the same subject, written by R. F. Barrow * and his co-authors in previous years. It is intended to give an overview of a vast subject, which spans a large section of the electromagnetic spectrum and invokes diverse experimental techniques to investigate systems ranging from diatomics to large organic and even biological molecules. We also supply references to recent work for further information. The impression is that combinations of existing experimental techniques are proving particularly fruitful at the moment, and that the complicity between theoretical chemistry and experimental spectroscopy has reached an even balance, since simulated spectra are commonly presented alongside the measurements made on systems of ever increasing complexity. Spectroscopy continues to serve as an experimental probe requiring and furnishing reliable frequency standards; the volume of information is always on the increase. Data

Journal

Annual Reports Section "C" (Physical Chemistry)Royal Society of Chemistry

Published: Jul 19, 2002

There are no references for this article.