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Non-pharmacological interventions for the prevention of venous thromboembolism: a literature review

Non-pharmacological interventions for the prevention of venous thromboembolism: a literature review Aim: To assess the relative clinical efficacy of different forms of non-pharmacological prophylaxis, intermittent pneumatic compression and graduated compression stockings in reducing the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients hospitalised following acute stroke. Method: This was a thematic synthesis of literature retrieved from a structured bibliographic search of: Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Summon, British Nursing Index, NHS Evidence, Internurse.com, PubMed, Ovid and the websites of other health information resources, such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the World Health Organization. Citations were also searched for using: Web of Science, Google Scholar, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Current Controlled Trials, Stroke Trials Registry and Clinical Trials. Findings: Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) showed a small but statistically significant ( P = 0.001) reduction in rates of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), in both symptomatic and asymptomatic DVT, involving proximal or calf veins, with fewer adverse effects such as skin breakdown and ulcers attributed to IPC, as compared to graduated compression stockings. No single intervention was the most effective for VTE prevention. Conclusion: More reliable evidence is required. Clear and extensive guidelines are necessary to ensure high-quality care for patients with acute stroke to improve their quality of life, and reduce morbidity and mortality rates. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing Standard Royal College of Nursing (RCN)

Non-pharmacological interventions for the prevention of venous thromboembolism: a literature review

Nursing Standard , Volume 31 (8) – Oct 19, 2016

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Publisher
Royal College of Nursing (RCN)
Copyright
©2012 RCN Publishing Company Ltd. All rights reserved. Not to be copied, transmitted or recorded in any way, in whole or part, without prior permission of the publishers.
Subject
Evidence & practice
ISSN
0029-6570
eISSN
2047-9018
DOI
10.7748/ns.2016.e10473
pmid
27808636
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aim: To assess the relative clinical efficacy of different forms of non-pharmacological prophylaxis, intermittent pneumatic compression and graduated compression stockings in reducing the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients hospitalised following acute stroke. Method: This was a thematic synthesis of literature retrieved from a structured bibliographic search of: Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Summon, British Nursing Index, NHS Evidence, Internurse.com, PubMed, Ovid and the websites of other health information resources, such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the World Health Organization. Citations were also searched for using: Web of Science, Google Scholar, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Current Controlled Trials, Stroke Trials Registry and Clinical Trials. Findings: Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) showed a small but statistically significant ( P = 0.001) reduction in rates of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), in both symptomatic and asymptomatic DVT, involving proximal or calf veins, with fewer adverse effects such as skin breakdown and ulcers attributed to IPC, as compared to graduated compression stockings. No single intervention was the most effective for VTE prevention. Conclusion: More reliable evidence is required. Clear and extensive guidelines are necessary to ensure high-quality care for patients with acute stroke to improve their quality of life, and reduce morbidity and mortality rates.

Journal

Nursing StandardRoyal College of Nursing (RCN)

Published: Oct 19, 2016

References

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