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Representing Atrocity in Taiwan: The 2/28 Incident and White Terror in Fiction and Film (review)

Representing Atrocity in Taiwan: The 2/28 Incident and White Terror in Fiction and Film (review) Because For Home and Country considers such an array of propaganda tools, all of which seem to embrace/deploy stereotypes of the adversary while celebrating the righteousness of the American or British or French nuclear family, this text is an engaging one. When a reader of today encounters images such as those of postcards that use children to defame the evil enemy via adult-centric scatological humor or the various "trading" cards distributed by Black Cat cigarettes showing women performing patriotic jobs, the dangers and historical roles of such propaganda pieces resound. Kingsbury's text is a useful one for scholars whose research focus concerns any one of the major visual or textual devices or communication genres about which she writes. While those who study music, or women's fiction, or the product advertising of the nineteen-teens might feel that her treatment of these areas is incomplete, which it can't help but be in a survey such as this, what these scholars can gain from her study is a better understanding, resulting from her clear critical apparatus, of the interplay between these tools as they mutually worked to motivate Allied women and children on the home front to perform a particular role http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rocky Mountain Review Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association

Representing Atrocity in Taiwan: The 2/28 Incident and White Terror in Fiction and Film (review)

Rocky Mountain Review , Volume 65 (2) – Nov 5, 2011

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Publisher
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
Copyright
Copyright © Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
ISSN
1948-2833
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Because For Home and Country considers such an array of propaganda tools, all of which seem to embrace/deploy stereotypes of the adversary while celebrating the righteousness of the American or British or French nuclear family, this text is an engaging one. When a reader of today encounters images such as those of postcards that use children to defame the evil enemy via adult-centric scatological humor or the various "trading" cards distributed by Black Cat cigarettes showing women performing patriotic jobs, the dangers and historical roles of such propaganda pieces resound. Kingsbury's text is a useful one for scholars whose research focus concerns any one of the major visual or textual devices or communication genres about which she writes. While those who study music, or women's fiction, or the product advertising of the nineteen-teens might feel that her treatment of these areas is incomplete, which it can't help but be in a survey such as this, what these scholars can gain from her study is a better understanding, resulting from her clear critical apparatus, of the interplay between these tools as they mutually worked to motivate Allied women and children on the home front to perform a particular role

Journal

Rocky Mountain ReviewRocky Mountain Modern Language Association

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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