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"Quo vadit poesis?": The Present State of Italian Poetry

"Quo vadit poesis?": The Present State of Italian Poetry "Quo vadit poesis?": The Present State of Italian Poetry Erasmo G. Gerato Florida State University century. There has been such a variety and abundance of not only poets but of diverse poetic expositions, tendencies, directions, and distinct schools of thought that in at least two cases, the Futuristic and Hermetic movements, we can speak of a total Italian experience. Never as in this century has Italy been faced with so much production and so many distinct literary movements. The century begins with Corrado Govoni, Aldo Palazzeschi, and Sergio Corazzini, Symbolist-Crepuscular writers who were indirectly influenced by the great French Symbolists Mallarmé, Rimbaud, and Verlaine, and more directly by the later Belgian Symbolists such as Samain, Thailhade, Moréas, Verhaeren, Rodenbach, Maeterlinch, and Jammes. As a result of their study of these Symbolists, the Italian Symbolist-Crepuscular poets accentuated melancholy and sentimentality. This is particularly true in the cases of Sergio Corazzini, in whom these feelings reach the ultimate realm of an outright malady, and of Guido Gozzano and Marino Moretti, whose works often approach the greater poetry of this century after the abandonment on their part of the aesthetic experience of the teachings of Gabriele D'Annunzio. Gozzano's masterful use of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association

"Quo vadit poesis?": The Present State of Italian Poetry

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Publisher
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
Copyright
Copyright © Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association
ISSN
1948-2833
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Abstract

"Quo vadit poesis?": The Present State of Italian Poetry Erasmo G. Gerato Florida State University century. There has been such a variety and abundance of not only poets but of diverse poetic expositions, tendencies, directions, and distinct schools of thought that in at least two cases, the Futuristic and Hermetic movements, we can speak of a total Italian experience. Never as in this century has Italy been faced with so much production and so many distinct literary movements. The century begins with Corrado Govoni, Aldo Palazzeschi, and Sergio Corazzini, Symbolist-Crepuscular writers who were indirectly influenced by the great French Symbolists Mallarmé, Rimbaud, and Verlaine, and more directly by the later Belgian Symbolists such as Samain, Thailhade, Moréas, Verhaeren, Rodenbach, Maeterlinch, and Jammes. As a result of their study of these Symbolists, the Italian Symbolist-Crepuscular poets accentuated melancholy and sentimentality. This is particularly true in the cases of Sergio Corazzini, in whom these feelings reach the ultimate realm of an outright malady, and of Guido Gozzano and Marino Moretti, whose works often approach the greater poetry of this century after the abandonment on their part of the aesthetic experience of the teachings of Gabriele D'Annunzio. Gozzano's masterful use of

Journal

Rocky Mountain Review of Language and LiteratureRocky Mountain Modern Language Association

Published: Jan 6, 1987

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