THE PATHOGENESIS OF ICTERUS

THE PATHOGENESIS OF ICTERUS These experiments indicate that, in obstructive jaundice, the bile which escapes from the liver is absorbed by the hepatic capillaries and carried by the blood to the kidneys. The presence of a thoracic duct fistula influences in no way the development of icterus after total obstruction of the common bile duct. Bile pigments, sufficient to give a Salkowski test, may or may not appear in the lymph of the thoracic duct in such experiments, their appearance possibly depending upon the rapidity of bile secretion and the amount of lymph flow. Chronic icterus developing in an animal with a thoracic duct fistula gives an interesting distribution of bile pigments in the body fluids. The lymph and pericardial fluid contain the same amount, which is much less than the content of bile pigment in the blood serum and urine. It seems clear that in both acute and chronic obstructive jaundice the lymphatic apparatus takes no essential or active part in the absorption of bile pigments from the liver. At best, the lymphatic system is a secondary factor in the mechanism of jaundice. Footnotes Submitted: 6 August 1910 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Experimental Medicine Rockefeller University Press

THE PATHOGENESIS OF ICTERUS

Loading next page...
 
/lp/rockefeller-university-press/the-pathogenesis-of-icterus-yigt9mlOZ5
Publisher
Rockefeller University Press
Copyright
© 1911 Rockefeller University Press
ISSN
0022-1007
eISSN
1540-9538
D.O.I.
10.1084/jem.13.1.115
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

These experiments indicate that, in obstructive jaundice, the bile which escapes from the liver is absorbed by the hepatic capillaries and carried by the blood to the kidneys. The presence of a thoracic duct fistula influences in no way the development of icterus after total obstruction of the common bile duct. Bile pigments, sufficient to give a Salkowski test, may or may not appear in the lymph of the thoracic duct in such experiments, their appearance possibly depending upon the rapidity of bile secretion and the amount of lymph flow. Chronic icterus developing in an animal with a thoracic duct fistula gives an interesting distribution of bile pigments in the body fluids. The lymph and pericardial fluid contain the same amount, which is much less than the content of bile pigment in the blood serum and urine. It seems clear that in both acute and chronic obstructive jaundice the lymphatic apparatus takes no essential or active part in the absorption of bile pigments from the liver. At best, the lymphatic system is a secondary factor in the mechanism of jaundice. Footnotes Submitted: 6 August 1910

Journal

The Journal of Experimental MedicineRockefeller University Press

Published: Jan 5, 1911

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off