Salmonella typhimurium initiates murine infection by penetrating and destroying the specialized epithelial M cells of the Peyer's patches.

Salmonella typhimurium initiates murine infection by penetrating and destroying the specialized... Salmonella species are known to initiate infection of mammalian hosts by penetrating the intestinal epithelium of the small bowel. These bacteria preferentially interact with Peyer's patches which are collections of lymphoid follicles making up the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. We infected murine ligated intestinal loops with invasive and noninvasive Salmonella typhimurium strains for 30, 60, 120, and 180 min and examined the infected tissue by transmission electron microscopy. Within 30 min, we found that invasive S. typhimurium exclusively entered M cells found within the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of the Peyer's patches. Initially, interactions between invasive bacteria and enterocytes adjacent to the M cells were not found. Invasion of M cells was associated with the ability of the bacteria to invade tissue culture cells. S. typhimurium mutants, which were noninvasive for tissue culture cells, could not be found in ligated loops associated with M cells or enterocytes after incubations of 30, 60, 120, or 180 min. At 60 min, internalized invasive S. typhimurium were cytotoxic for the M cells. Destruction of an M cell formed a gap in the FAE which allowed organisms to invade enterocytes adjacent to the dead cell. Later in the infection process (120 and 180 min), the presence of bacteria beneath the FAE correlated with changes in the cytoarchitecture of the lymphoid follicle. In addition, replicating Salmonella began to enter both the apical and basolateral surfaces of enterocytes adjacent to infected M cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Experimental Medicine Rockefeller University Press

Salmonella typhimurium initiates murine infection by penetrating and destroying the specialized epithelial M cells of the Peyer's patches.

The Journal of Experimental Medicine, Volume 180 (1): 15 – Jul 1, 1994

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Publisher
Rockefeller University Press
Copyright
© 1994 Rockefeller University Press
ISSN
0022-1007
eISSN
1540-9538
D.O.I.
10.1084/jem.180.1.15
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Salmonella species are known to initiate infection of mammalian hosts by penetrating the intestinal epithelium of the small bowel. These bacteria preferentially interact with Peyer's patches which are collections of lymphoid follicles making up the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. We infected murine ligated intestinal loops with invasive and noninvasive Salmonella typhimurium strains for 30, 60, 120, and 180 min and examined the infected tissue by transmission electron microscopy. Within 30 min, we found that invasive S. typhimurium exclusively entered M cells found within the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of the Peyer's patches. Initially, interactions between invasive bacteria and enterocytes adjacent to the M cells were not found. Invasion of M cells was associated with the ability of the bacteria to invade tissue culture cells. S. typhimurium mutants, which were noninvasive for tissue culture cells, could not be found in ligated loops associated with M cells or enterocytes after incubations of 30, 60, 120, or 180 min. At 60 min, internalized invasive S. typhimurium were cytotoxic for the M cells. Destruction of an M cell formed a gap in the FAE which allowed organisms to invade enterocytes adjacent to the dead cell. Later in the infection process (120 and 180 min), the presence of bacteria beneath the FAE correlated with changes in the cytoarchitecture of the lymphoid follicle. In addition, replicating Salmonella began to enter both the apical and basolateral surfaces of enterocytes adjacent to infected M cells.

Journal

The Journal of Experimental MedicineRockefeller University Press

Published: Jul 1, 1994

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