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A few findings which seem to be of importance may be pointed out:— Table I shows the analytical figures of serum-albumin, serum-globulin, and fibrin of the normal dog. The main difference between albumin and globulin appears in the relation of the precipitable to the non-precipitable total nitrogen and amino-nitrogen. Precipitable total nitrogen as well as amino-nitrogen is considerably larger in the albumin than in the globulin. In the cases of uranium nitrate nephritis (table II), the important figures approximate very closely those of normal serum-albumin. The samples from dog 3, that had been poisoned at the same time with phosphorous oil and uranium nitrate, show relatively large variations as compared with the figures from specimens from the other dogs, chiefly as regards the amino-nitrogen distribution: i. e ., in dog 3, (1) the amount of amino-nitrogen to the total nitrogen in the solution before precipitation is higher; (2) the percentage of precipitable amino-nitrogen is larger; and (3) the ratio of precipitable amino-nitrogen to precipitable total nitrogen exceeds that of the other cases. All these changes, together with the fact that the total precipitable nitrogen did not undergo any quantitative variation, suggest that in the case of dog 3 the analyzed material contained a higher amount of lysin or cystin. It may further be mentioned that the analytical figures in this case differ also from those of the normal serum-albumin and still more from those of the serum-globulin. These changes, however, were not found in the case of dog 4, although this animal was treated in the same manner as the preceding dog. In the cases of nephritis in man (table III), striking differences were met with in the case of acute scarlet fever nephritis (No. 1 a ) and in the case (No. 2) of a patient with chronic nephritis and Pott's disease. This patient died a few weeks after the specimen for analysis was collected. The autopsy showed a general amyloidosis. The variations in both cases consist in a lowering of the ratio of amino-nitrogen to total nitrogen in the solution before precipitation, and corresponding to this, a fall of the same ratio in the filterable nitrogen. Such a change points to a relatively larger amount of prolin and oxyprolin or tryptophan in these cases. As a whole, one may conclude that Van Slyke's method, carefully applied and sufficiently controlled, may also be used for the study of urinary albumin. The results already obtained indicate that definite differences in the composition of urinary "albumin" may be detected. As yet it is premature to establish a definite relationship between the chemical composition of the "albumin" and the clinical or pathological conditions under which it appears, but it seems hopeful that further work may lead to the finding of such a relationship. Footnotes Submitted: 25 June 1911 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Experimental Medicine Rockefeller University Press

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