Human osteoblasts support hematopoiesis through the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

Human osteoblasts support hematopoiesis through the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating... Previous attempts at identifying the constitutive source(s) of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human bone marrow have been unsuccessful despite the fact that normal bone marrow supports abundant myelopoiesis in vivo. We hypothesized that the intimate physical association between bone and hematopoietic cells facilitates interactions between osteoblasts and hematopoietic stem cells. Here we provide the first direct evidence that human osteoblasts participate in hematopoiesis by constitutively producing G-CSF and present the protein in a membrane-associated fashion to human hematopoietic progenitors. These results suggest a direct and central role for osteoblasts in normal myelopoiesis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Experimental Medicine Rockefeller University Press

Human osteoblasts support hematopoiesis through the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

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Publisher
Rockefeller University Press
Copyright
© 1994 Rockefeller University Press
ISSN
0022-1007
eISSN
1540-9538
D.O.I.
10.1084/jem.179.5.1677
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous attempts at identifying the constitutive source(s) of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in human bone marrow have been unsuccessful despite the fact that normal bone marrow supports abundant myelopoiesis in vivo. We hypothesized that the intimate physical association between bone and hematopoietic cells facilitates interactions between osteoblasts and hematopoietic stem cells. Here we provide the first direct evidence that human osteoblasts participate in hematopoiesis by constitutively producing G-CSF and present the protein in a membrane-associated fashion to human hematopoietic progenitors. These results suggest a direct and central role for osteoblasts in normal myelopoiesis.

Journal

The Journal of Experimental MedicineRockefeller University Press

Published: May 1, 1994

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