Cell Death Regulation in Drosophila

Cell Death Regulation in Drosophila Cell Death Regulation in Drosophila <h3>Conservation of Mechanism and Unique Insights</h3> Stephanie Y. Vernooy a , Jeffrey Copeland a , Nazli Ghaboosi a , Erik E. Griffin a , Soon Ji Yoo a , and Bruce A. Hay a Division of Biology, MC156-29, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125. Fax: (626) 449-0756 Phone: (626) 395-3399 Email: haybruce@its.caltech.edu a Division of Biology, MC156-29, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is a genetically encoded form of cell suicide that results in the orderly death and phagocytic removal of excess, damaged, or dangerous cells during normal development and in the adult. The cellular machinery required to carry out apoptosis is present in most, if not all cells, but is only activated in cells instructed to die (for review see Jacobson et al. 1997 ). Here, we review cell death regulation in the fly in the context of a first pass look at the complete Drosophila genome and what is known about death regulation in other organisms, particularly worms and vertebrates. Next Section <h3>Caspases: The Core of the Cell Death Machine</h3> The caspase family of cysteine proteases is central to apoptotic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Cell Biology Rockefeller University Press

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Publisher
Rockefeller University Press
Copyright
© 2000 The Rockefeller University Press
ISSN
0021-9525
eISSN
1540-8140
D.O.I.
10.1083/jcb.150.2.F69
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cell Death Regulation in Drosophila <h3>Conservation of Mechanism and Unique Insights</h3> Stephanie Y. Vernooy a , Jeffrey Copeland a , Nazli Ghaboosi a , Erik E. Griffin a , Soon Ji Yoo a , and Bruce A. Hay a Division of Biology, MC156-29, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125. Fax: (626) 449-0756 Phone: (626) 395-3399 Email: haybruce@its.caltech.edu a Division of Biology, MC156-29, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, is a genetically encoded form of cell suicide that results in the orderly death and phagocytic removal of excess, damaged, or dangerous cells during normal development and in the adult. The cellular machinery required to carry out apoptosis is present in most, if not all cells, but is only activated in cells instructed to die (for review see Jacobson et al. 1997 ). Here, we review cell death regulation in the fly in the context of a first pass look at the complete Drosophila genome and what is known about death regulation in other organisms, particularly worms and vertebrates. Next Section <h3>Caspases: The Core of the Cell Death Machine</h3> The caspase family of cysteine proteases is central to apoptotic

Journal

The Journal of Cell BiologyRockefeller University Press

Published: Jul 24, 2000

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